Art for Easter: John and Peter Running to the Tomb / and Music: Graham Kendrick “I Know He Lives”

April 22, 2014

The following wondeful artwork was included in the April 21st devotional at the fantastic Biola Lent project site.

It’s John & Peter Running to the Tomb, by Eugene Burnand, from the Musee d’Orsay, Paris.

I’d never seen it before.  Look at the hope in their faces… they long to believe that Christ is no longer dead, but they don’t yet know…  Wow.  So powerful, the longing, the hope, the grief.

 

John & Peter running to the tomb

In reflecting on that picture, all I could think of is how THANKFUL I am that we who are in  Christ, have, in the words of the burial liturgy of the Book of Common Prayer “a sure and certain hope of resurrection to eternal life, through our Lord Jesus Christ.”  Hallelujah!

We no longer are in doubt, Christ IS risen!  He is seated at the Father’s right hand, His work finished.  He is interceding for us and one day will raise us to be with Him.

Here are just a few of the Scriptures that articulate our HOPE in Christ:

Heb 6:19-20
We have this as a sure and steadfast anchor of the soul, a hope that enters into the inner place behind the curtain, where Jesus has gone as a forerunner on our behalf…

John 11:25
Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. Whoever believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live,

1 Cor 15:20-24
But in fact Christ has been raised from the dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep. … in Christ shall all be made alive. … Then comes the end, when he delivers the kingdom to God the Father after destroying every rule and every authority and power.

1 Cor 15:54-57
“Death is swallowed up in victory.”
“O death, where is your victory?
O death, where is your sting?”

The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law. But thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.

***

Here’s a wonderful song by UK songwriter and worship leader Graham Kendrick which rejoices in this hope we have in Christ:  I Know He Lives!


(Should the embedded audio file above not display or play properly, use this link, but please respect copyright and purchase the song if you intend to keep it.)

The version of the song I’ve uploaded was available as a free download from Graham Kendrick’s website a few years ago.  The song is available for purchase on Graham Kendrick’s album Banquet.

Here are the words:

We have a strong and certain hope
Fixed and unchanging not in vain
We have a friend in heaven’s court
Since Jesus rose to life again

We have an anchor for the soul
Since Jesus’ blood has made a way
Into the deepest heart of God
Before the Father’s throne of grace

I know he lives
Jesus is alive
And he reigns in glory now
I know he lives
And with him we’ll rise
Hallelujah
I know he lives

We have a King high over all
The new creation’s firstborn Son
New heav’n and earth await his call
We shall be like him when he comes

We see him now in majesty
Enthroned above the galaxies
Until his glory burst the skies
And all creation joins the cry

I know he lives
Jesus is alive
And he reigns in glory now
I know he lives
And with him we’ll rise
Hallelujah
I know he lives
Jesus is alive
And he reigns in glory now
I know he lives
And with him we’ll rise
Hallelujah
I know he lives
I know he lives
I know he lives

Graham Kendrick
Copyright © 2008 Make Way Music
http://www.grahamkendrick.co.uk


The Rev. Patrick Comerford’s 2012 Series “Poems for Easter”

April 20, 2014

In 2012, the Rev. Patrick Comerford posted a seven-part series of Poems for Easter.   Here are the links:

Poems for Easter (1): ‘Easter’ by George Herbert

Poems for Easter (2): ‘Easter Wings’ by George Herbert

Poems for Easter (3): ‘Loneliness’ by John Betjeman

Poems for Easter (4): Easter Communion, by Gerard Manley Hopkins

Poems for Easter (5): ‘Easter Poem’ by Ted Walker

Poems for Easter (6): ‘Easter Hymn 6,’ by Tom Wright

Poems for Easter (7): ‘The Easter Day’ by Dionysios Solomos

***

As any of our readers who visited Patrick Comerford’s site to read his 2012 Lenten Poem series will know,  each post has detailed background about the poet and the context of the poem, as well as often an anaysis of key themes.  Highly recommended.  I would love to see the Rev’d Comerford do another poetry series!  He clearly loves poetry and he writes about it with passion and great insight.


A Compilation of Easter Poems (a work in progress….!)

April 20, 2014

I have been utterly astounded at the popularity of our Good Friday Poems Compilation during the past week (7000 page views in about 12 days!).  We’ve not historically posted that much poetry here at Lent & Beyond, but as I began seeing many site visitors looking for poetry, I did some searches myself and discovered just how hard it is to find a solid online listing of Christ-honoring poetry – especially compilations of poems for major liturgical seasons and feasts.  I don’t claim to be a poetry expert, but I appreciate good poetry when I find it.  Like music it sometimes helps open my heart to truths of Scripture and truth about God in ways that prose can’t always do.  So… I’ve spent some time in the past few days looking for online poetry anthologies and scouring them for Easter-themed poetry.  I present the poems I’ve discovered below.  Many of them are new to me.  Please consider this a rough draft… I probably will revise and update it over the coming 1 – 2 weeks.  I truly would love comments from those of you who read this post, especially recommendations of poets and poems we’ve missed that should be included.   May these poems help increase in all our hearts the wonder of Christ’s resurrection and deepen our joy in Him.  — Karen B.

***

1.  Easter Poems previously posted here at L&B

Another Easter Poem by Emergent Kiwi: Tree of Life

An Easter Poem: Resurrection Door Kicker

A Serbian Easter Poem: Christ is Risen and Brings the Joy!

Easter Poem: George Herbert

***

2. Easter Poems found from various sources online:

(these are currently in very random order, as I found them, and there may be duplicates…)

Easter Day,  By Edmund Spenser (1552?–1599)

Four Sonnets: IV. “Death, be not proud, though some have called thee”  By John Donne (1573–1631)

John Donne:  Easter Day

A Hymn of the Resurrection  By William Drummond (1585–1649)

The Resurrection  By Giles Fletcher (1588?–1623)

Easter By George Herbert (1593–1633)

Easter, George Herbert (from The Temple)

Ralph Vaughn Williams: Five Mystical Songs

 An Easter Hymn  By Thomas Blackburne (1821–1859)

Sir John Browning: Resurrection

Sarah Flower Adams: “The mourners came at break of day

John Mason Neale: “’Tis the Day of Resurrection

Francis Turner Palgrave:  I am the Resurrection and the Life

John Ellerton: “God of the living

John Ellerton:  “Welcome, happy morning!”

Alexander B. Grosart:  The Resurrection

Thomas Kelly:  “The head that once was crowned with thorns

Thomas Kelly:  “Look, ye saints, the sight is glorious

Elizabeth Charles:  “Around a Table, not a Tomb

Frances Elizabeth Cox:  “Jesus lives! no longer now

Sabine Baring-Gould: “On the Resurrection morning

The Day of Resurrection

Holy Sonnets, VII by John Donne

John Donne:  Resurrection, Imperfect

George Herbert:  Easter Wings

George Herbert:  Easter

George Herbert:  Easter Song

Christina Rossetti:  The Descent from the Cross

Christina Rossetti:  It is Finished

Christina Rossetti:  An Easter Carol

John Donne:  Resurrection

Phillip Brooks:  An Easter Carol

Gerard Manley Hopkins Where Springs Not Fail

John Updike:  Seven Stanzas at Easter

Paul Willis – “Rosing from the Dead”

Edmund Spenser – “Sonnet #68″

Nicholas Samaras – “Easter in the Cancer Ward”

Katharine Tynan – “Easter”

Charles G.D. Roberts – “Resurrection”

John Terpstra – “Topographies of Easter”

A.J.M. Smith – “Beside One Dead”

“Galilee, Easter Day” by Luci Shaw

Amy Carmichael: Cross and Garden

Brother Roger of Taize:  If You Were Not Risen

Easter poems by John Keble (not complete)

Gerard Manley Hopkins:  Easter, and Easter Communion

Sonrise, by Kevin Kummer

On Easter: A Poem of Venantius Honorius Clementianus Fortunatus (d. AD 600)

Easter Night, Alice Meynell (1847-1922)

From the Rev’d Patrick Comerford’s 2012 Poems for Easter series:

***

3.  Additional Easter Poetry Compilations and Resources:

Dont miss also the Eastertide poetry by Teresa Roberts Johnson at Angliverse

Also Emily Polis Gibson’s Easter entries often include poetry

(I will probably compile separate listings of both of these sites and then link those listings here)

Finally, our compilation of Poems for Lent also contains links to various poetry websites where you can find more poems.

***

Thanks for putting up with the mess…. I’ll try to put this into some more coherent order soon!


Classic CCM for Holy Saturday into Easter: Christian Stephens’ The Descent, and Arise

April 19, 2014

This is the third of three posts with music from Christian Stephens’ self-titled album (1980, Creation records).

On Wednesday I posted 2 songs:  Look What You’ve Done, and Broken and Bleeding.  On Friday, I posted Song of the Cross which is the first part of a trilogy of songs for the Triduum.

Below follow the two additional songs:  The Descent and Arise.   You should listen to and read the lyrics from Song of the Cross before listening to the songs below.  As explained in yesterday’s entry, the songs imagine a dialogue between Jesus and the Father.

Here’s the audio file (the two songs are combined into one track).  The lyrics follow.

(Should there be any problem with the embedded audio, use this link.)

 ***

The Descent
[S] = the Son, [F] = the Father

[S] O my Father, can You hear me call?
I need Your light, there’s darkness over all.
I ache to hear Your voice but remain here all alone
Father, when will I begin my journey home?

[F] O my Son, I know You cannot hear.
But I am coming, behold I am very near.
Hold to my words until You hear the trumpet call,
Then You my Son will rise the victor of all!

[S] I ache to hear Your voice, but remain here all alone
Father when will I begin my journey home?

***

Arise

[F] “Arise! And come to me my Son.
Arise! And come to me my Son!”

[S] Father, I feel Your touch of life from above
Lifting me by the power of Your love.
Hallelujah, I am alive again!
Hallelujah, I am alive again!
[Death] tried to hold me back,
tried to hold me down,
While the power of life lifts me off the ground.
Hallelujah, I am alive again!
Hallelujah, I am alive again!
Hallelujah, I am alive again!
Hallelujah, I am alive again!
And I have overcome!
Yes, I have overcome!
Yes, I have overcome!

***

HALLELUJAH, HALLELUJAH, HALLELUJAH!!!


Poems for Holy Saturday

April 19, 2014

Here’s the section of Poems for Holy Saturday from our larger compilation of Poems for Holy Week.

5. Holy Saturday:


Lent and Beyond: Good Friday 2014 Index

April 18, 2014

I (Karen) have had the joy and privilege of being able to take a Holy Week retreat the past 2 days, which enabled me to find a a lot of wonderful devotional material online to share here.  I never expected to post so many entries today, but I have been so thankful to spend the day in worship, prayer and reflection through the various devotionals, hymns, poems, etc. that I’ve posted.  Here’s an index of all our Good Friday posts today, starting with the earliest entries first.

  • GOOD FRIDAY 2014 (the header post which appeared at the top of the blog throughout the day with several key links)

 

 ***

After the posting of “DEAD!” at 20:00 GMT this evening, I won’t post anything further until 16:00 GMT tomorrow (noon Eastern) [Jill or Torre may perhaps post some entries, however].  I’ve scheduled five posts for Holy Saturday tomorrow afternoon and evening.  I’ve so enjoyed devotional blogging this Lent and Holy Week.  I hope to be able to continue posting with some frequency throughout the 50 Days of Easter.  Stay tuned….

I and all of us here at Lent & Beyond wish a blessed Good Friday, Holy Saturday and a GLORIOUS Easter to all our readers and friends.  - Karen B.  L&B founder


A Baroque “Shape Poem” for Good Friday: On the Crucified Jesus

April 18, 2014

While working on my compilation of Good Friday poems a few weeks ago, one of the most unique poems I found is the following baroque “shape poem” Uber den gekreutzigten Jesus, by  Catharina Regina von Greiffenberg.  This translation is by .  Very impressive to be able to reproduce this shape poem so nicely in translation!

On the Crucified Jesus
See the King of Kings hangs there/
sprinkles us all with his blood.
His wounds are the fountain/
flowing with our salvation.
See /  he stretches out his hands to catch us all;
How he’s longing to press us to his burning heart.
Yes, he bows his dearest head, greedy for kisses.
His thoughts and his limbs alike poured out
to our salvation.
His side is open /
to show his gracious heart:
If we look with a full mind
we shall see ourselves there.
So many stripes/so many wounds/
we may count on his body/
So many springs of victory and blessing
He longed to create for our souls.
Between heaven and earth
longed to offer himself up
and reconcile us with GOD.
To strengthen us/ he faded away:
Yes, his death/ has given life
to me and all the world.
Jesus Christ! Your death and pain
Live and breathe in my heart again!
- Catharina Regina von Greiffenberg , 1633-1694

(trans Grace Andreacchi)
German text


A Poem for Good Friday – Amy Carmichael: Lest We Forget

April 18, 2014

I’ve been re-reading a bunch of Amy Carmichael’s poetry from her books Toward Jerusalem, and Mountain Breezes, this Lent.  Here’s one of her poems that’s appropriate for Good Friday.  I particularly like the last line… it reminds me to pray for those who are lost and wandering, that they would find their home, rest and joy in Christ.  How incredible that Christ’s pain was for our joy, and His death became our life – fullness of life for now and eternity.

Home of our hearts, lest we forget
What our redemption meant to Thee,
Let our most reverent thoughts be set
Upon Thy Calvary.

We, when we suffer, turn and toss
And seek for ease, and seek again;
But Thou upon Thy bitter cross
Wast firmly fixed in pain.

And in our night star-clusters shine,
Flowers comfort us, and joy of song;
No star, no flower, no song was Thine,
But darkness three hours long.

We in our lesser mystery,
Of lingering ill, and winged death,
Would fain see clear; but could we see,
What need would be for faith?

O Lord beloved, Thy Calvary
Stills all our questions. Come, oh come,
Where children wandering wearily
Have not yet found their home.

- Amy Carmichael, Rose from Briar, page 46


A Hymn for Good Friday #2: O Love Divine, What Hast Thou Done

April 18, 2014

A wonderful hymn by Charles Wesley that is new to me…  I’m so thankful these are not mere words, but TRUTH.

O Love divine, what hast thou done!
The immortal God hath died for me!
The Father’s co-eternal Son
Bore all my sins upon the tree.
Th’immortal God for me hath died:
My Lord, my love, is crucified!

Is crucified for me and you,
To bring us rebels back to God.
Believe, believe the record true,
Ye all are bought with Jesus’ blood.
Pardon for all flows from His side:
My Lord, my love, is crucified!

Behold and love, ye that pass by,
The bleeding Prince of life and peace!
Come, sinners, see your Savior die,
And say, Was ever grief like His?
Come, feel with me His blood applied:
My Lord, my love, is crucified!

Then let us sit beneath His cross,
And gladly catch the healing stream:
All things for Him account but loss,
And give up all our hearts to Him:
Of nothing think or speak beside,
My Lord, my love, is crucified!


Classic CCM Songs for Holy Week: Many Years Ago (Mickey & Becki Moore)

April 17, 2014

http://c3.cduniverse.ws/resized/250x500/music/668/7821668.jpgYesterday I wrote about my love of certain classic CCM songs and albums from the 1970s and early 80s, and how good it is to increasingly find much of it available online.  A very surprising album to find online a few months ago was Mickey and Becki Moore’s Everything is Under Control (Wo Wo), from 1976.   I heard them in concert in my hometown in NJ twice while I was in high school.  As they produced most of their albums independently, it was a wonderful surprise to find most on iTunes.

One of their songs, Many Years Ago is among my favorite songs for Holy Week.  Another song of theirs I recommend for Holy Week is Was it for Nothing

***

Here is Many Years Ago:

(There should be an embedded audio file and play arrow above, but WordPress has not always been displaying embedded music correctly lately.  If it does not show up, click this link, but please respect the copyright and purchase the song if you intend to keep it.)

Many years ago, so the story goes there lived a simple man.
He was a carpenter by trade,
though the best things that He made were never found in wood.
They would find Him at His work in the morning in the dark before the sun arose, before the sun arose.

So many years ago, so the story goes, there lived a good man.
They say His words were made of gold and His arms were made to hold the sorrows of the world.
That there was something in His eyes that was like unto the skies before the sun arose, before the sun arose.

So many years ago, so the story goes, there lived a great man.
They say He walked upon the sea and He taught man to be free, to love their fellow man.
And He spoke unto their lives and He opened up their eyes before the sun arose, before the sun arose.

But they didn’t like the carpenter, and they said He was no good.
So they took Him out one cold Friday, and they nailed Him to His wood.
And they said “come down ye carpenter,” and they laughed and mocked His name.
But He only shook His head at them, for He loved them just the same.
Then the sun went behind the cloud, and lightning filled the air, and a voice cried within the crowd “was a god really there?”

Many years ago, so the story goes there lived a simple man.
He was a carpenter by trade, though the best things that He made were never found in wood.
They would find him at his work in the morning in the dark before the sun arose.
And the Son arose, and the Son arose.

- Mickey and Becki Moore, 1976. From the album Everything is Under Control.

(You can get all of Mickey & Becki’s albums from their website.  Also, 4 of their albums are available at iTunes.)


Three Devotionals with Music for Maundy Thursday from our 2012 Archives

April 17, 2014

I think all the music links are now working properly.  WordPress seems to be very balky with embedded music this week.  My apologies for any problems in listening to the songs.  I’ve provided alternate links whereever possible.

***

In 2012 I posted three separate devotional entries for Maundy Thursday, each containing art and music:

I will be posting some new music later today, and perhaps some original devotional reflections as well.

 ***

Several other of the best illustrated & musical devotionals for Holy Week from our archives include:


Trevin Wax: Arms Outstretched

April 17, 2014

Trevin Wax who is one of the bloggers at The Gospel Coalition, yesterday posted a beautiful poem / reflection on Christ’s outstretched arms of love:

Here’s the beginning:

Those hands need nails to keep them in line.

Something must be done.

Those arms must never embrace again.

We saw His arm reach out when He touched the leper, in defiance of our purity laws.

We saw His hands lift the face of an adulterous woman, thwarting our execution of her just sentence.

We saw Him welcome children into His arms, as if one must become like an infant to belong to His kingdom.

We saw Him break bread and divide the fish, as if He were supplying manna from heaven.

We saw His arms beckon sinners to His table, as if by repentance one can wash away the past.

We saw His arms do nothing to stop a sinful woman from anointing Him, as if He were a treasure greater than her priceless perfume.

We saw His arms crack the whip and overturn the tables, as if He were in charge of the temple.

And then we watched Him lead the blind and the lame inside, as if God’s house were for the broken and weary.

His hands are tainted, unwashed, defiled.

His hands, just like His speeches, are always about Him. He never ceases to point to Himself.

As if He were the only way. As if He alone has truth. As if He alone gives life.

His arms are open to anyone (anyone!) who will repent, and yet He bars the door from those of us who need no repentance.

Keep reading at Kingdom People.


“Something for the Feast” a poem by Teresa Roberts Johnson on the betrayal by Judas

April 16, 2014

Something for the Feast

With them you walked and closely held the purse,
The cunning one so trusted, yet so cursed.
Grave countenance to cover evil plans,
Imagining the coins in your hands,
You ate the bread, then lifted up your heel
To crush the One who offered you the meal.
Yes, quickly go into the dark of night
To make your deal; betray the One True Light.
For if you change your mind, the world is lost.
No other sacrifice can pay the cost.
Go, sell the perfect Lamb to the chief priest,
Obtaining what is needed for the Feast.
As your companions thought, your deeds secured
Provision for the poor, who had endured
The terrors of the one whose path you chose.
His plans the God of Heaven to oppose
Came to fruition on the bloody cross,
While deeper plans unraveled all his power.
He won and lost it all in that same hour.
There in the presence of our greatest foe
The feast was set and blessings overflow.

by Teresa Roberts Johnson, Copyright 2013

Go to Angliverse to read more of Teresa’s Holy Week poetry, and to read her notes on this poem.

***

As we continue to think of Judas’ betrayal of Jesus today, you may also enjoy these devotionals:

And here are two other poems about Judas and his betrayal:


A Palm Sunday poem by Teresa Roberts Johnson: The Witness

April 13, 2014

Donkeys seem to inspire Palm Sunday poetry, of course including GK Chesterton’s well-known poem, The Donkey.

In a similar vein, Anglican poet, Teresa Roberts Johnson, who blogs at Angliverse, last year wrote a poem entitled the Witness.  Here’s the first half of the poem:

The Witness:

One minute I was dozing in the morning sun;
Then I awoke to find my ropes had been undone.
The kindest Man that I have ever seen drew near,
And with one gentle touch He drove away my fear.
When His disciples led me to a crowded street
I bowed my back to Christ, the Mercy Seat.
So I, a donkey, bore the burden of the Lord;
Beneath my feet were palm fronds, spread there by a horde
Of selfish people who had sought to crown Him king,
And loud hosannas through the lanes began to ring.   [.... there's more ....]

Go read it all, along with her notes on the background to. the poem

And don’t miss her brand new Holy Week poem posted today entitled Fourth Day.

***

See our compilation of Poems for Holy Week for more Palm Sunday poetry.


Lent Music: Come Sinners to the Gospel Feast

April 10, 2014

There seems to be a bit of a theme developing in my Lent music listening and posting here at Lent & Beyond.  I am finding myself very drawn to “old hymns made new” (to borrow from the title of a great Scott Wesley Brown album of a number of years ago…!)

Recently at Vicar’s Versicles, James Gibson posted a lovely arrangement of a hymn by John Wesley which I’d never heard before:  Come Sinners to the Gospel Feast.   I really enjoyed it.

It would make a good song for a contemporary Good Friday worship service. The version below is performed by Jon Yerby and the band from The Journey in St. Louis, MO.  (www.journeyon.net).  It’s available at iTunes.

Here are the lyrics, including some additional verses from the original hymn not included in this recording.

Come, sinners, to the Gospel feast;
Let every soul be Jesus’ guest.
Ye need not one be left behind,
For God hath bid all humankind.

Sent by my Lord, on you I call;
The invitation is to all.
Come, all the world! Come, sinner, thou!
All things in Christ are ready now.

Come, all ye souls by sin oppressed,
Ye restless wanderers after rest;
Ye poor, and maimed, and sick, and blind,
In Christ a hearty welcome find.

[Come, and partake the Gospel feast;
Be saved from sin; in Jesus rest;
O taste the goodness of your God,
And eat His flesh, and drink His blood!

You vagrant souls, on you I call;
(O that my voice could reach you all!)
You all may now be justified,
You all may live, for Christ hath died.

My message as from God receive;
Ye all may come to Christ and live.
O let His love your hearts constrain,
Nor permit Him to die in vain.]

His love is mighty to compel;
His conquering love consent to feel,
Yield to His love’s resistless power,
And fight against your God no more.

See Him set forth before your eyes,
That precious, bleeding Sacrifice!
His offered benefits embrace,
And freely now be saved by grace.

This is the time, no more delay!
This is the Lord’s accepted day.
Come thou, this moment, at His call,
And live for Him who died for all.

There are additional verses included at the Cyber Hymnal


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