CRUCIFIED

April 6, 2012

*music links verified and updated 2014*

[a repost of a 2009 entry]

Crucified

art credit:  Matthias Grunewald, The Crucifixion

2 Cor 5:21
God made him who had no sin to be sin for us, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.

Gal 3:13
Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us, for it is written: “Cursed is everyone who is hung on a tree.”

1 Pet 2:22-24
“He committed no sin, and no deceit was found in his mouth.” When they hurled their insults at him, he did not retaliate; when he suffered, he made no threats. Instead, he entrusted himself to him who judges justly. He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, so that we might die to sins and live for righteousness; by his wounds you have been healed.

***

Listen: Behold the Wood  (Dan Schutte, from the album Here I Am, iTunes link)

Listen: Prayer before the Cross (John Michael Talbot, from Troubadour of the Great King, 1982. iTunes link)

 

(There should be a playlist above, but sometimes WordPress has been balky with embedded audio.  Should the songs not play correctly, try these links: Behold the Wood; Prayer Before the Cross.  But please respect copyrights and purchase the songs if you plan to keep them.)

 

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Prayers based on the Seven Words from the Cross (Project Canterbury)

April 6, 2012

[a repost from 2007 & 2009]

Prayers based on the seven words on the Cross

Filed under: Meditations & Devotions, Lent 2007, Lent Prayers — Karen B.


Below, I posted a series of meditations from Project Canterbury based on Jesus’ Seven Words from the Cross.

Since the whole text is long, however, I thought it might be profitable to post the prayers or exhortations which conclude each of the seven meditations to aid in our Good Friday devotions.

First Word.
“Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.”

Blessed Jesus, as we behold Thee being nailed to the cross, and listen to Thy words, we pray Thee that we may evermore be unselfish, mindful of others in all our trials and afflictions, be they never so severe; ever ready to forgive and to seek forgiveness; and ever guided and governed by the Holy Spirit in striving to speak and to do only that which is right, and the influence of which may be for the good of others.

***

Second Word.

“Lord, remember me when Thou comest into Thy Kingdom. And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, To-day shalt thou be with me in Paradise.”

Merciful and adorable Jesus, Thou who when dying didst promise Paradise to the dying, penitent thief, kneeling at the foot of Thy cross this day, we ask Thee to look upon us just as we are; there is no sin that we would keep back from Thee, for we desire that all may this day be forgiven, and we desire that we may be willing here after to suffer and to have our faith tried even as Thou wilt; if so be we may at the last be with Thee in Paradise, it matters not through what we pass in going thither.

***

Third Word.
“Woman, behold thy Son. Behold thy Mother.”

O blessed Jesus, our Lord and our God, help us so to hear Thy words and the words of Thy Father, that we may be enabled to fulfill all the duties which Thou wouldst have us fulfill towards all those whom Thou hast given to us. Let us not love father or mother, husband or wife, brother or sister, child or friend more than Thee; but ever mindful of Thy word and example, let not even our love for Thee, nor any thing, make us forgetful of the love and duty which we owe to others.

***

Fourth Word.
“My God, my God, why hast Thou forsaken me?”

Let us then, brethren, while careful to check and control and put away, so far as possible, desponding thoughts, and watchful over our imaginations, not suffering them to fancy difficulties, obstacles, troubles, and failures, if like many saints before us and even like our Divine Master Himself, we have sometimes to pass through a cloud in the journey of life, not be afraid. If we sometimes have to feel that we are left, deserted, let us look up to Him and listen to His word which He has uttered for our consolation, our hope, “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?”

***

Fifth Word.
“I Thirst.”

But the same lips that said “I thirst,” said also, “Blessed are they that hunger and thirst after righteousness.” And into those lips no doubt is it that David put the words: Like as the hart desireth the water-brooks, so longeth my soul after Thee, O God. My soul is athirst for God, yea, even for the living God; so that as there was a longing for something to slake the natural thirst, so there was a thirst which was a longing for the souls of men, a hunger and thirst for righteousness and for the accomplishment of the perfect will of God. And, brethren, know we anything of this sort? Is there with us any desire for the higher life, for holiness, for attaining to the righteousness which God would have us reach; any desire for extending Christ’s kingdom for winning souls to Him; any desire to do all that in us lies for the missions and in the missionary work of the Church, answerable to the craving of the bodily appetite of thirst? O Blessed Jesus, that it might ever more be so! that we might be athirst for Thee, athirst for likeness to Thee, athirst for the saving of souls for which Thou didst hang this day upon the shameful tree.

***

Sixth Word.
“It is Finished.”

Let us then, dear brethren, now lift up our hearts to the Blessed Master and say: Hereafter may we strive, even in the very pettiest details of our daily life, and especially in all that we are to do in working out our own salvation, in the least as well as in the greatest of our secular duties, and in the least as well as in the greatest of our religious duties, to be more and more mindful, and more and more influenced by this Thy word upon the cross, “It is finished.”

***

Seventh Word.
“Father, into Thy hands I commend my spirit.”

And as we look up to Him with adoring love and gratitude, and with the echo of these last words still sounding in our ears, what is the use that we shall make of them? What is the resolution that we shall form from them for the future, whereby to testify our love and gratitude for all that was accomplished for us as on this day, whereby to manifest our desire to be like in all things unto Christ our Master and example? Shall we resolve in all things hereafter to strive to be more resigned to the will of our Heavenly Father–to give up ourselves utterly and forever, body, soul, and spirit into His hands–to be content and to desire that He should rule and direct all that concerns us, from the least thing to the greatest–to see His hand in all things–living and dying to have no wishes and no will but His? Shall we resolve that our last words at night, as our eyes close in sleep, shall be none other than Thine, Blessed Jesus–Father, into Thy hands I commend my spirit? That ever as we draw near to the altar to commemorate Thy most precious death, we will repeat them, as Thy saints of old have been wont to do? And that, with our expiring breath, when we too shall be dying, we will strive to make them our last utterance! All this may we indeed do. But may we not fail our life long to do that which we doubt not will be most honorable, most acceptable unto thee–even that which Thou by the mouth of thine apostle Peter hast bidden us, viz.: daily in well-doing to commit the keeping of our souls to God as unto a faithful creator. Be this our resolution, at Thy cross this day, daily hereafter, in well-doing, in daily striving to follow the blessed steps of Thy most holy life, to commit the keeping of our souls to God as unto a faithful creator.


Good Friday Devotional – Brazen Serpent

April 6, 2012

*Music links updated 2014*

art credit: Anthony vanDyck, the Brazen Serpent

***

The blog the King’s English has become a favorite of mine this Lent.  In reding a recent post on The Brazen Serpent, I knew I had to post that at L&B today for Good Friday:

Here’s what Jesus says:

As Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of man be lifted up: That whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have eternal life. (John 3:14-15)

Numbers is our story. We are the faithless grumblers. We too are sick with sin, awaiting death. There’s only one cure – behold the One lifted up. He became the very thing that afflicted us – He became sin (2 Corinthians 5:21). And now, what must we do to be saved?

Behold!

That’s it. Just behold. We are simply to “look and live” (Numbers 21:9).

Don’t ignore the snake bites. Don’t try to reason with God. Don’t try to suck out the poison. Don’t offer up some sacrifice of your own devising. Don’t turn to some voodoo spell. Don’t ask Moses to save you. Just look to the One lifted up.

So what is faith?

Faith is not a quality you find within yourself. Faith is looking away from yourself. Faith is not a thing you conjure up. Faith is beholding something else (Someone else!). Faith is looking to Jesus.

Many people say they would like to have faith, or they would like to have more faith. But the answer is not to have “more faith”. It’s to have “more Christ!” When we behold Him, that is faith. Therefore the life of faith, is the life of setting Christ before our eyes and saying to our souls: Behold! Behold the Lamb of God! Behold the Lord of Glory lifted up for you! On the cross, He became our sin, so that we might become His righteousness.

The full entry is here.

***

Worship music:

Lift Up the Suffering Symbol, Michael Card, from his 1989 album, The Beginning

(An embedded song and play arrow should show up above, but sometimes WordPress seems to be acting up with audio file embeds. If the song does not show up, or does not play, you can find a YouTube version here.)


Good Friday: Illustrated Devotionals & Prayers from our 2006 Archives

April 6, 2012

I’ve found working archive links for our 2006 series of Good Friday illustrated devotional  entries at our old, now defunct, site.  Rather than take the time to try and recopy them here (which can be a lot of work with formatting, updating links and getting the artwork right), I’m just going for now post the links.

***

Here is the link to view all the entries posted on Good Friday in 2006.  The post at the top of the page is a long list of links which probably will not be worth spending time on, but scroll down to see all the illustrated entries grouped together, as they were meant to be viewed in series.

Alternately, here are the links to the individual posts:

GOOD FRIDAY

[Untitled]

My God, My God, Why Hast Thou Forsaken Me?

[Untitled]

Litany of the Passion

Also from our 2006 Good Friday posts:  Sermon for Good Friday

***

Note:  I apologize that there are no visible art credits or citations for the paintings.  At our old blog, the details showed up when one rolled one’s mouse over the picture, but that feature is lost in the archive version.  All the pictures came from the amazing Web Gallery of Art, one of the best sites on the internet!


John 13:36-38

April 6, 2012

Simon Peter said to him, “Lord, where are You going?” Jesus answered him, “Where I am going you cannot follow me now, but you shall follow me afterward.” (John 13:36)
      Jesus, prepare my heart for that day afterward when I will follow you.

Peter said to him, “Lord, why can i not follow you now? i will lay down my life for your sake.” (John 13:37)
      Holy Spirit, teach me humility and rid me of all vain promises.

Jesus answered him, “Will you lay down your life for my sake? Most assuredly, I say to you, the rooster shall not crow till you have denied me three times.” (John 13:38 )
      Father, you know the many times I have denied Jesus by my words and deeds and especially by my times of keeping silent when I should have spoken. Have mercy on me and forgive me for Jesus’ sake.

A word received: Tell me your troubles, I will listen.

Good Friday: 95* & 22 * 40:1-14(15-19),54; Lam. 3:1-9, 19-33: 1 Pet. 1:10-20: John 13:36-38**;       : : : : : :: John 19:38-42***
Good Friday Holy Communion: 22:1-21 or 22:1-11 or 40:1-14 or 69:1-23; Isaiah 52:13-53:12 or Genesis 22:1-18 r Wisdom 2:1,12-24; ebrews 10:1-25; John (18:1-40)19:1-37
Holy Saturday: 95 & 88 * 27; Lam. 3:37-58: Heb. 4:1-16: Rom. 8:1-11
Holy Saturday Holy Communion: 130 or 31:1-5; Job 14:1-14; 1 Peter 4:1-8; Matthew 27:57-66 or John 19:38-42

      Notes from the Front Line

***** Start now reading and reflecting on the lessons for Sunday so that you can receive all that God has for you (Easter Day: 118:14-29 or 118:14-17,22-24; Acts 10:34-43 or Isaiah 25:6-9; Colossians 3:1-4 or Acts 10:34-43; Mark 16:1-8 ).

***** Date: Thu, 05 Apr 2012
From: Nigel Mumford
Subject: Daily quote
ear Theophilus,
      Did you know that you are Theophilus in God’s eyes. Theophilus is The Greek name for “Loved by God.” Do you have any idea how loved you are Theophilus? You are so loved that God gave His only Son that we might have life and life abundant. Live into you name Theophilus. Know and enjoy that perfect love, a pure gift from God himself.
      God bless you Theophilus. Have a nice day! Have a blessed life dear Theophilus. ~ Fr. Nigel Mumford+

Albany Intercessor


Good Friday Quotes: Trevin Wax – The Cross Offers a Glimpse into the Heart of God

April 6, 2012

Trevin Wax, who blogs at Kingdom People, recently posted this excerpt from his book The Counterfeit Gospels:

When the Romans crucified criminals in the first century, it was customary for them to nail an accusation list to the cross. The list informed people why this person was being crucified. When Jesus died, God took the accusations that Satan brings against us—all our failures and mistakes, our willful rebellion, and our constant inability to keep God’s law—and God nailed those accusations to the cross of His Son. So Jesus Christ died there on Calvary, bearing your sin and mine; the accusations that should be hurled against us were hurled against Him instead.

On the cross, God demonstrated His perfect justice and His great mercy. He executed justice by pouring out His wrath against sin upon His only Son. He showed mercy by absorbing that wrath Himself, thus allowing us to escape His judgment.

Because Jesus was filled with horror and cried out, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” we are filled with wonder and cry, “My God, my God, why have you accepted me?”

Because Jesus cried, “Father, forgive!” the taunts we hurled at Him on the cross are transformed into praise for His generous mercy.

Because Jesus said, “I thirst,” we can drink from the fountain of living water and never thirst again.

Because Jesus said, “Woman, behold your son,” and felt the pain of separation from His earthly family, we can experience the blessing of being united with a heavenly family.

Because Jesus cried, “It is finished!” our new life can begin.

Because Jesus committed His spirit into the Father’s hands, God commits His Spirit into our hearts.

Jesus is the Passover Lamb—the substitute that protects us from the wrath of God. He experienced the curse of God, the punishment for sin, the hellish torments of eternal damnation—all for the glory of God and the salvation of His people.

– from Counterfeit Gospels, 97-98.


A Good Friday Prayer: Let me cling to the cross

April 6, 2012

Help me to cling to the cross,
be crucified to the world by it,
and in it find deepest humiliation,
motives to patience and self-denial,
grace for active benevolence,
faith to grasp eternal life,
hope to lift up my head,
love to bind me for ever
to him who died and rose for me.

May Christ’s shed blood make me
more thankful for your mercies,
more humble under your correction,
more zealous in your service,
more watchful against temptation,
more contented in my circumstances,
more useful to others.

– Puritan Prayer (adapted) from Valley of Vision: A collection of Puritan Prayers & Devotions, pg. 46

-From the great collection of prayers at Trevin Wax’s blog.


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