Two Worship Songs for a Maundy Thursday evening

April 17, 2014

Two worship songs I’ve been listening to this evening and thought others might appreciate.  They’ve helped me to worship the Lord for the gift of His body and His blood, for His willingness to be the sacrifice Lamb:

  • Stuart Townend’s “Behold the Lamb (Communion Hymn)” from his album There is Hope (Live), 2010.
  • Graham Kendrick’s “Come and See,” (featuring Faye Simpson), from the album The Very Best of Graham Kendrick – Knowing You Jesus, 2010

(There should be an embedded audio file and play arrow above, but WordPress has not always been displaying embedded music correctly lately.  If it does not show up, use these links: Behold the Lamb, Come and See,  but please respect the copyright and purchase the songs if you intend to keep them.)

The lyrics follow below.  First some Scripture verses to reflect on:

But he was pierced for our transgressions;
he was crushed for our iniquities;
upon him was the chastisement that brought us peace,
and with his wounds we are healed.
All we like sheep have gone astray;
we have turned—every one—to his own way;
and the LORD has laid on him
the iniquity of us all.  (Isaiah 53:5-6 ESV)

So when Pilate saw that he was gaining nothing, but rather that a riot was beginning, he took water and washed his hands before the crowd, saying, “I am innocent of this man’s blood; see to it yourselves.” And all the people answered, “His blood be on us and on our children!” Then he released for them Barabbas, and having scourged Jesus, delivered him to be crucified.

Then the soldiers of the governor took Jesus into the governor’s headquarters, and they gathered the whole battalion before him. And they stripped him and put a scarlet robe on him, and twisting together a crown of thorns, they put it on his head and put a reed in his right hand. And kneeling before him, they mocked him, saying, “Hail, King of the Jews!” And they spit on him and took the reed and struck him on the head. And when they had mocked him, they stripped him of the robe and put his own clothes on him and led him away to crucify him.   (Matthew 27:24-31 ESV)

 ***

 

Behold the Lamb (Communion Hymn)  [See also Stuart Townend’s website]

by, Keith Getty , Stuart Townend , Kristyn Lennox Getty.  CCLI #: 5003372

Behold the Lamb who bears our sins away
Slain for us and we remember
The promise made that all who come in faith
Find forgivness at the cross

So we share in this bread of life
And we drink of His sacrifice
As a sign of our bonds of (peace)  (subsequent verses:  love, grace)
Around the table of the King

The body of our Saviour Jesus Christ
Torn for you eat and remember
The wounds that heal the death that brings us life
Paid the price to make us one

The blood that cleanses ev’ry stain of sin
Shed for you drink and remember
He drained death’s cup that all may enter in
To receive the life of God

And so with thankfulness and faith we rise
To respond and to remember
Our call to follow in the steps of Christ
As his body here on earth

Final Chorus:
As we share in His suffering,
We proclaim: Christ will come again!
And we’ll join in the feast of heaven
Around the table of the King.

 ***

Come and See (We Worship at Your Feet)

Come and see, come and see
Come and see the King of love
See the purple robe and crown of thorns he wears
Soldiers mock, rulers sneer
As he lifts the cruel cross
Lone and friendless now he climbs towards the hill

We worship at your feet
Where wrath and mercy meet
And a guilty world is washed
By love’s pure stream
For us he was made sin
Oh, help me take it in
Deep wounds of love cry out ‘Father, forgive’
I worship, I worship
The Lamb who was slain.

Come and weep, come and mourn
For your sin that pierced him there
So much deeper than the wounds of thorn and nail
All our pride, all our greed
All our fallenness and shame
And the Lord has laid the punishment on him

Man of heaven, born to earth
To restore us to your heaven
Here we bow in awe beneath
Your searching eyes
From your tears comes our joy
From your death our life shall spring
By your resurrection power we shall rise

Graham Kendrick
Copyright © 1989 Make Way Music,
http://www.grahamkendrick.co.uk

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Maundy Thursday Devotional: The Greatest Prayer in the World

April 17, 2014

I highly commend to you the Holy Week Devotional today at Desiring God’s blog, it’s a wonderful and deep Scripture-filled reflection on Christ’s prayer in the Garden of Gethsemene.

Here’s an excerpt:

If Jesus had not been obedient unto death, he would have been swallowed up by death forever and there would be no resurrection, no salvation, and no future world filled with the glory of God’s grace and God’s children. This is what Jesus prayed for “to him who was able to save him from death” — that is, save him from a death that would not succeed its saving mission.

“He was heard for his godly fear.” God did save him from the threat that such a death posed to his obedience. Jesus did succeed. There is salvation for all who believe. There will be a new world full of the glory of God’s grace and God’s children.

And all of this is owing to the greatest prayer in the world. Every hope of the gospel succeeds because of Jesus’s reverent earnestness in prayer, and the answer of the Father. “Being in an agony he prayed more earnestly . . . and he was heard because of his reverence” (Luke 22:44; Hebrews 5:7).

Evidently, by the time Jesus was done praying in Gethsemane, the Father had not only made clear that there is no other way than the cross, but also that this way would succeed. The Lamb would have the reward of his suffering. He will “see his offspring; he will prolong his days; the will of the Lord will prosper in his hand. Out of the anguish of his soul he will see and be satisfied” (Isaiah 53:10–11).

Surely this is why Hebrews 12:2 could say, “For the joy that was set before him he endured the cross.” Beneath the terrors of present agony was the taste of future joy. The angel had come, “strengthening him” — clarifying, confirming, connecting the coming joy.

But take the time if at all possible to go and read the full entry.

***

Lord Jesus, thank You that You prayed earnestly and were strengthened in Your obedience to the Father, even unto death.  Lord, I’m challenged that I need to watch and pray, being willing to give up sleep and other comforts in order that I might learn obedience.  Father, help me to delight in seeking Your will, to persevere in prayer until I can find joy in obedience.  Thank You Lord Jesus that even now You are at the Father’s right hand interceding for me and all Your followers.  Strengthen us to watch and pray that we may not fall into temptation, we pray in Your most holy name.  Amen.


Classic CCM Songs for Holy Week: Many Years Ago (Mickey & Becki Moore)

April 17, 2014

Note: this song is ALSO appropriate for an Easter playlist since it includes mention of the resurrection.

https://i2.wp.com/c3.cduniverse.ws/resized/250x500/music/668/7821668.jpg

Yesterday I wrote about my love of certain classic CCM songs and albums from the 1970s and early 80s, and how good it is to increasingly find much of it available online.  A very surprising album to find online a few months ago was Mickey and Becki Moore’s Everything is Under Control (Wo Wo), from 1976.   I heard them in concert in my hometown in NJ twice while I was in high school.  As they produced most of their albums independently, it was a wonderful surprise to find most on iTunes.

One of their songs, Many Years Ago is among my favorite songs for Holy Week.  Another song of theirs I recommend for Holy Week is Was it for Nothing

***

Here is Many Years Ago:

(There should be an embedded audio file and play arrow above, but WordPress has not always been displaying embedded music correctly lately.  If it does not show up, click this link, but please respect the copyright and purchase the song if you intend to keep it.)

Many years ago, so the story goes there lived a simple man.
He was a carpenter by trade,
though the best things that He made were never found in wood.
They would find Him at His work in the morning in the dark before the sun arose, before the sun arose.

So many years ago, so the story goes, there lived a good man.
They say His words were made of gold and His arms were made to hold the sorrows of the world.
That there was something in His eyes that was like unto the skies before the sun arose, before the sun arose.

So many years ago, so the story goes, there lived a great man.
They say He walked upon the sea and He taught man to be free, to love their fellow man.
And He spoke unto their lives and He opened up their eyes before the sun arose, before the sun arose.

But they didn’t like the carpenter, and they said He was no good.
So they took Him out one cold Friday, and they nailed Him to His wood.
And they said “come down ye carpenter,” and they laughed and mocked His name.
But He only shook His head at them, for He loved them just the same.
Then the sun went behind the cloud, and lightning filled the air, and a voice cried within the crowd “was a god really there?”

Many years ago, so the story goes there lived a simple man.
He was a carpenter by trade, though the best things that He made were never found in wood.
They would find him at his work in the morning in the dark before the sun arose.
And the Son arose, and the Son arose.

– Mickey and Becki Moore, 1976. From the album Everything is Under Control.

(You can get all of Mickey & Becki’s albums from their website.  Also, 4 of their albums are available at iTunes.)


Three Devotionals with Music for Maundy Thursday from our 2012 Archives

April 17, 2014

I think all the music links are now working properly.  WordPress seems to be very balky with embedded music this week.  My apologies for any problems in listening to the songs.  I’ve provided alternate links whereever possible.

***

In 2012 I posted three separate devotional entries for Maundy Thursday, each containing art and music:

I will be posting some new music later today, and perhaps some original devotional reflections as well.

 ***

Several other of the best illustrated & musical devotionals for Holy Week from our archives include:


A Prayer for Maundy Thursday

April 17, 2014

In his prayer for Maundy Thursday, Pastor Scotty Smith remembers that “Maundy” is the Latin word for “Mandate” – Christ’s command to us to love one another as He loved us….

***

Now before Feast of the Passover, when Jesus knew that his hour had come to depart out of this world to the Father, having loved his own who were in the world, he now showed them the full extent of his love. (John 13:1) A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another. (John 13:34-35)

 Dear Lord Jesus, as I meditate and pray my way through these Scriptures, my heart is stunned, silenced and left in awe. What but the gift of faith can enable us to grasp the wonder of these words and the magnificence of this moment? What but the power of the gospel can free us, to believe and obey them? Grant us both, I pray, grant me both.

     On our Holy Week calendar we call today Maundy, or “Mandate” Thursday. It’s a day in the history of redemption brimming over with glory and grace. Passover will soon become the Lord’s Supper—your supper. The promises of the Old Covenant are about to be fulfilled by the blood of the New Covenant—your life given as a ransom for us on the cross.

     Having shared eternal glory with the Father, you now show measureless grace to your disciples. Having loved this ragtag bunch of broken men—who vied for positions of honor a few hours earlier (Mk. 10:35-45), and who would all scatter and deny you later that same evening—having loved them so well, you now show them the full extent of your love.

     Your disrobing to wash their feet was with a full view to your being stripped naked to wash their hearts, and our hearts. What wondrous love is this indeed! How wide, long, high, and deep! (Eph. 3:14-19)

      “Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another” (John 13:34). This is the new and never-ending mandate you’ve given us as your disciples. The most obvious expression of our “getting” the gospel is our loving others as you have loved, and do love, us. Jesus, fill my heart with an even greater knowledge of your love, that I may love others, more spontaneously, sacrificially, and joyfully. So very Amen I pray, in your triumphant and tender name.

from here.


Maundy Thursday Devotionals at the King’s English

April 17, 2014

The Rev. Glen Scrivener at the King’s English blog writes daily devotionals on key phrases of Scripture – passages from the King James Version that have shaped our language and culture.  But his entries are not about linguistics, they are all focused on Christ, and how even very small details in Scripture from both the Old and New Testaments point to and exalt Christ and His work of redemption and salvation.

Here are passages from the Maundy Thursday readings with Glen has posted in previous years.  They are all excellent.  Take some time to delve deeply into the Scripture and symbolism of all Christ did and said this day before His crucifixion.

Related to the Last Supper:

Foot Washing  John 13:1

Jesus Took Bread and blessed it Matthew 26:26

This is my body  Matthew 26:26

This is my blood  Matthew 26:28

 

Related to Christ’s prayer in Gethsemene

Abba Father  Mark 14:36

Let this cup pass  Matthew 26:39

Spirit is willing, the flesh is weak  Matthew 26:41

 

You can find a full list of all the phrases and Scriptures which Glen has blogged on here.


Holy Week Quotes: Fr. Tim Fountain on the tradition of veiling crosses during Holy Week

April 17, 2014

At Stand Firm, there is wonderful commentary from the Rev. Tim Fountain about the symbolism and significance of the common Anglican practice of veiling the cross during Holy Week:

There’s a certain contradiction or at least irony in the tradition.  We are proclaiming the cross, after all, and with intensity in Lent and Holy Week as we look at the burden of our sins and the Lord’s gift of his body and blood for the forgiveness of same.  […]  So why veil what we’re so busy exalting?

My working answer is that veiling the cross does exalt it, via a negative path.  Hiding it reveals a tremendous absence, “What if the cross of Christ never existed?  What if that reference point didn’t exist for our understanding of life?  What if that sign never intruded into history and culture?”

I worked questions like those into a Lenten sermon decades ago.  I still remember a woman who came up after and said, “I felt all the air go out of the church when I thought about those questions you asked.  They were terrifying.”

So there’s power in veiling crosses for Lent.  It intensifies big questions, “What if we are left in our sins and our own self-justifying efforts to ‘balance them out?’  What if there’s no decisive God-given remedy for the human dilemma?”

And in aggravating that tension, the veiled cross sets up the strong medicine of Good Friday and the glorious recovery announced at Easter…

Go read the full entry.


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