DEAD! The Author of Life lies in a tomb….

April 18, 2014
The Passion, detail.  Hans Holbein the younger.  From Web Gallery of Art.

The Passion, detail. Hans Holbein the younger. From Web Gallery of Art.

art credit

How incredible.  Jesus, God Himself, the Author of Life, was nailed to a cross and died, and his Body was placed in a tomb.  How can it be?  A devotional reflection from Desiring God in 2013 reminds us how and why it happened.  The blame rests on US!!

Holy Week makes us uncomfortable. There is glorious life and victory to come on Easter Sunday, but to get there we must pass directly through the darkness of Good Friday. We must remember the day when human malice broke barriers and reached levels of previously unmatched atrocity. The Messiah, the King, come to save mankind, was nailed to an accursed tree and left to die.

There is no immunity for such cosmic treason.

On Good Friday we feel the finger of guilt and culpability rightly shoved into the ribs of humanity:

  • “…this Jesus whom you crucified…” (Acts 2:36)
  • “…you denied the Holy and Righteous One, and asked for a murderer to be granted to you, and you killed the Author of life…” (Acts 3:14–15)
  • “…whom you killed by hanging him on a tree…” (Acts 5:30)

 

Think on that fact for the next 24 hours….

art credit: (clicking on the image below will give you a larger version)

The Body of the Dead Christ in the Tomb, Hans Holbein the Younger, from the Web Gallery of Art.

The Body of the Dead Christ in the Tomb, Hans Holbein the Younger, from the Web Gallery of Art.

 


Lent and Beyond: Good Friday 2014 Index

April 18, 2014

I (Karen) have had the joy and privilege of being able to take a Holy Week retreat the past 2 days, which enabled me to find a a lot of wonderful devotional material online to share here.  I never expected to post so many entries today, but I have been so thankful to spend the day in worship, prayer and reflection through the various devotionals, hymns, poems, etc. that I’ve posted.  Here’s an index of all our Good Friday posts today, starting with the earliest entries first.

  • GOOD FRIDAY 2014 (the header post which appeared at the top of the blog throughout the day with several key links)

 

 ***

After the posting of “DEAD!” at 20:00 GMT this evening, I won’t post anything further until 16:00 GMT tomorrow (noon Eastern) [Jill or Torre may perhaps post some entries, however].  I’ve scheduled five posts for Holy Saturday tomorrow afternoon and evening.  I’ve so enjoyed devotional blogging this Lent and Holy Week.  I hope to be able to continue posting with some frequency throughout the 50 Days of Easter.  Stay tuned….

I and all of us here at Lent & Beyond wish a blessed Good Friday, Holy Saturday and a GLORIOUS Easter to all our readers and friends.  – Karen B.  L&B founder


Various Scriptures Prayed

April 18, 2014

And he took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, “This is my body which is given for you; do this in remembrance of me.” (Luke 22:19)
      Jesus, thank you for breaking into my life; thank you for being broken for me.

Likewise he also took the cup after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood, which is shed for you. Luke 22:20
      Jesus, thank you for pouring out your life-blood for me.

Then, six days before the Passover, Jesus came to Bethany, where Lazarus was who had been dead, whom he had raised from the dead. (John 12:1)
      Jesus, thank you for loving me and all your disciples to the end.

There they made him a supper; and Martha served, but Lazarus was one of those who sat at the table with him. Then Mary took a pound of very costly oil of spikenard, anointed the feet of Jesus, and wiped his feet with her hair. And the house was filled with the fragrance of the oil. Then one of his disciples, Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, who would betray him, said, “Why was this fragrant oil not sold for three hundred denarii and given to the poor?” (John 12:2-5)
      Thank you, Jeus, for service me and all your disciples with such humility.

This he said, not that he cared for the poor, but because he was a thief, and had the money box; and he used to take what was put in it. But Jesus said, “Let her alone; she has kept this for the day of My burial. For the poor you have with you always, but Me you do not have always.” Now a great many of the Jews knew that he was there; and they came, not for Jesus’ sake only, but that they might also see Lazarus, whom he had raised from the dead. But the chief priests plotted to put Lazarus to death also, (John 12:6-10)
      Holy Spirit, please help me receive the service of others with the humility you desire of me.

because on account of him many of the Jews went away and believed in Jesus. The next day a great multitude that had come to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem, took branches of palm trees and went out to meet him, and cried out: “Hosanna! ‘Blessed is he who comes in the name of the LORD!’ The King of Israel!” Then Jesus, when he had found a young donkey, sat on it; as it is written: “Fear not, daughter of Zion; behold, your King is coming, sitting on a donkey’s colt.” (John 12:11-15)
      Father, please help us daily follow Jesus’ example of service to others.

For I received from the Lord that which I also delivered to you: that the Lord Jesus on the same night in which he was betrayed took bread; (1 Corinthians 11:23)
      Jesus, please help us follow Paul’s example of giving to others what we have received from you.

In the daytime also he led them with the cloud, And all the night with a light of fire. (Psalm 78:14)
      LORD, lead us today, by day and by night.

A word received: I have provided for you over and over again. Trust me.

Now there stood by the cross of Jesus his mother, and his mother’s sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene. (John 19:25)
      Holy Father, bless all those women who stand by the the foot of the cross today with your son Jesus: the Sisters of St. Mary, the Daughters of the King, the altar guilds, and all the others. Thank you for their faithful watching and service. By your Holy Spirit, bring forth many vocations to these ministries of prayer and service.

But this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins forever, sat down at the right hand of God, (Hebrews 10:12)
      Jesus, thank you for offering yourself as that perfect sacrifice to take away my sins.

from that time waiting till his enemies are made his footstool. For by one offering he has perfected forever those who are being sanctified. (Hebrews 10:13-14)
      Holy Spirit, enter that work of perfecting me and making me holy.

And the people shall be like the burnings of lime; Like thorns cut up they shall be burned in the fire. (Isaiah 33:12)
      Jesus, thank you for interceding for us.

A word received: I have paid the price for your redemption.

Holy Communion
Good Friday: 22:1-21 or 22:1-11 or 40:1-14 or 69:1-23; Isaiah 52:13—53:12 or Genesis 22:1-18 or Wisdom 2:1,12-24; Hebrews 10:1-25; John (18:1-40)19:1-37
Holy Saturday: 130 or 31:1-5; Job 14:1-14; 1 Peter 4:1-8; Matthew 27:57-66 or John 19:38-42
Morning Prayer
Good Friday: 95* & 22 * 40:1-14(15-19),54; Lam. 3:1-9, 19-33: 1 Pet. 1:10-20: John 13:36-38**; John 19:38-42***
Holy Saturday: 95** & 88 * 27; Lam. 3:37-58: Heb. 4:1-16**: Rom. 8:1-11***
* For the Invitatory: ** Intended for use in the morning: *** Intended for use in the evening

Albany Intercessor


Good Friday Hymns #4: In Evil Long I Took Delight (John Newton) / The Look (adaptation by Bob Kauflin)

April 18, 2014

Back in 2010 we posted the lyrics to John Newton’s hymn In Evil Long I Took Delight.  At the time, I referenced a modern adaptation of this classic hymn by Bob Kauflin of Sovereign Grace Music.  However, the links provided in our old post no longer work, so I thought I’d post this hymn again this year.

First, the modern adaptation of Newton’s hymn by Bob Kauflin.

The Look, by Bob Kauflin, Sovereign Grace Music  (also available at iTunes)

VERSE 1
I saw one hanging on a tree
In agony and blood
Who fixed His loving eyes on me
As near His cross I stood
And never till my dying breath
Will I forget that look
It seemed to charge me with His death
Though not a word He spoke

VERSE 2
My conscience felt and owned the guilt
And plunged me in despair
I saw my sins His blood had spilt
And helped to nail Him there
But with a second look He said
“I freely all forgive
This blood is for your ransom paid
I died that you might live”

CHORUS
Forever etched upon my mind
Is the look of Him who died
The Lamb I crucified
And now my life will sing the praise
Of pure atoning grace
That looked on me and gladly took my place

VERSE 3
Thus while His death my sin displays
For all the world to view
Such is the mystery of grace
It seals my pardon too
With pleasing grief and mournful joy
My spirit now is filled
That I should such a life destroy
Yet live by Him I killed

© 2001 Sovereign Grace Praise (BMI).

***

Now, as to John Newton’s original hymn, it is nearly impossible to find any recording of it (with sung lyrics) online or at iTunes.  With some deep digging in Google, however, I found a free download (which I thoroughly scanned for viruses!) of a very nice recording accompanied by acoustic guitar.   I enjoyed hearing John Newton’s lyrics brought to life with a tune that’s simple and singable.

UPDATE:  I kept searching online and I’ve now been able to identify the artist who recorded the version of Newton’s hymn I’ve posted below.  It’s a singer / songwriter from Indiana maned Phil KirkThe track is available on Soundcloud, as are other hymns by this artist.

(should the audio file not display or play properly, try this link)

This hymn by John Newton was part of the famous “Olney Hymnal”  of 1779.  (available online at CCEL) You can hear the tune at the Cyber Hymnal

In evil long I took delight,
Unawed by shame or fear,
Till a new object struck my sight,
And stopped my wild career.

I saw One hanging on a tree,
In agonies and blood,
Who fixed His languid eyes on me,
As near His cross I stood.

Sure, never till my latest breath,
Can I forget that look;
It seemed to charge me with His death,
Though not a word He spoke.

My conscience felt and owned the guilt,
And plunged me in despair,
I saw my sins His blood had spilt,
And helped to nail Him there.

Alas, I knew not what I did,
But now my tears are vain;
Where shall my trembling soul be hid?
For I the Lord have slain.

A second look He gave, which said,
“I freely all forgive;
This blood is for thy ransom paid;
I die that thou mayst live.”

Thus, while His death my sin displays
In all its blackest hue,
Such is the mystery of grace,
It seals my pardon too.

With pleasing grief and mournful joy,
My spirit is now filled;
That I should such a life destroy,
Yet live by him I killed.

John Newton

Finally, here is some good background on John Newton and his hymn.


Classic CCM for Good Friday: Christian Stephens – Song of the Cross

April 18, 2014

christian-stephens-frontOn Wednesday I shared about a favorite out-of-print CCM album which has many great songs for Holy Week.  Christian Stephens self-titled album from 1980.   I posted 2 songs from the album.  Today I’m posting another song from this album:  Song of the Cross.

Tracks 8 and 9 of the album form a trilogy of songs:

  • Song of the Cross, (track 8)
  • the Descent, and Arise  (track 9)

The songs are an imaginary dialogue between Jesus and the Father during the events of Good Friday and then they continue into Holy Saturday when Christ is in the tomb, and then capture the glory of Easter morning when the Father calls forth Jesus from the tomb.   It’s a very special set of songs which burned themselves on my mind and heart when I was a teenager.  I still get goosebumps and grow teary-eyed when I listen to it, even after all these years…

Here below for Good Friday is the Song of the Cross.  On Saturday evening I will post the Descent and Arise.

I hope these songs bless and encourage you as they have me.  They remind us of Christ’s obedience unto death and the Father’s perfect love that did not spare even His only beloved Son.  How wonderful that this is not just a creative lyric, but TRUTH.  May the Lord help us to adore Him this Good Friday as we remember His death to redeem us.

***

Song of the Cross (Christian Stephens, 1980)

(The audio is sometimes slow to load.  Should there be any problem with the embedded audio, use this link.)

[S] = the Son, [F] = the Father

[S] Oh my Father, they nailed me to the tree
This seeming defeat is Your precious victory
Forgive them Father. They know not what they do
My stripes will heal them.
My blood will see them through.

[F] Dearest Child. If there had been some other way to bring man home
than for Your precious blood to atone for his guilt and sin,
You wouldn’t be there.

[S] O my Father, it is finished, my life is done
Your perfect love has helped me overcome
Oh let Your will be completed within me
And let my life be acceptable unto Thee.

[F] O my Son, Your life indeed was a beautiful song to me
A violin announcing perfect victory
Why can’t they see Your great love for me?

[S] O my Father, I cannot breathe again
I commit my soul into Your glorious hands.
Accept my death on behalf of all my friends
They may not see now, but they will understand in the end.

[F] Beloved One, I cannot help you now,
but just hold on my Son.
You will be with me in a while
And I will hold You close to me
You have set Your brothers free.

[S] O my God, if I had just one more breath
I’d tell them I love them again.
But I feel the sting of death.
It’s cold and hard.
And I feel so alone, but my hope is set on You
In three days I will be home.

[F] My dear child, can You still hear my voice, I’m calling You
I want You to know that I’m so in love with You, I’m in love with You…

***

Note: the song posted is a digitized version of my original vinyl album.  There are some scratches, etc.  I believe the album is out of print, but if anyone knows of a CD or digital version available for purchase, I would love to know so I can link it here and ensure royalties go to the artist.


For Good Friday: 3 tracks from Max Lucado’s He Chose the Nails

April 18, 2014

He_Chose_Nails_CDEarlier in Lent I posted all the tracks from a now out-of-print and unavailable musical CD which was released to accompany Max Lucado’s devotional book He Chose the Nails in 2000.

I thought I’d highlight three of my favorite tracks here for Good Friday.

They include a spoken devotional by Max Lucado, a short instrumental “Requiem” and Wes King’s wonderful rendition of the Thread of Scarlet which still gives me goosebumps every time I listen to it.  The total play time of these three tracks is about 8 minutes:

(If the playlist does not display or play correctly use these links:  Calvary, Requiem, Thread of Scarlet)


A Baroque “Shape Poem” for Good Friday: On the Crucified Jesus

April 18, 2014

While working on my compilation of Good Friday poems a few weeks ago, one of the most unique poems I found is the following baroque “shape poem” Uber den gekreutzigten Jesus, by  Catharina Regina von Greiffenberg.  This translation is by .  Very impressive to be able to reproduce this shape poem so nicely in translation!

On the Crucified Jesus
See the King of Kings hangs there/
sprinkles us all with his blood.
His wounds are the fountain/
flowing with our salvation.
See /  he stretches out his hands to catch us all;
How he’s longing to press us to his burning heart.
Yes, he bows his dearest head, greedy for kisses.
His thoughts and his limbs alike poured out
to our salvation.
His side is open /
to show his gracious heart:
If we look with a full mind
we shall see ourselves there.
So many stripes/so many wounds/
we may count on his body/
So many springs of victory and blessing
He longed to create for our souls.
Between heaven and earth
longed to offer himself up
and reconcile us with GOD.
To strengthen us/ he faded away:
Yes, his death/ has given life
to me and all the world.
Jesus Christ! Your death and pain
Live and breathe in my heart again!
– Catharina Regina von Greiffenberg , 1633-1694

(trans Grace Andreacchi)
German text


Hymns for Good Friday #3: Ah Holy Jesus, How Hast Thou Offended

April 18, 2014

Thanks to the nice website of the Center for Church Music – SongsandHymns.org (which I linked earlier in Lent), a wonderful version of Ah Holy Jesus, How Hast Thou Offended, written by Johann Heermann in 1630.

Hymn Details here.

Listen here (Mp3)

Ah, holy Jesus, how hast Thou offended,
That man to judge Thee hath in hate pretended?
By foes derided, by Thine own rejected,
O most afflicted.

Who was the guilty- Who brought this upon Thee?
Alas, my treason, Jesus, hath undone Thee.
‘Twas I, Lord, Jesus, I it was denied Thee!
I crucified Thee.

For me, kind Jesus, was Thine incarnation,
Thy mortal sorrow, and Thy life’s oblation;
Thy death of anguish and Thy bitter passion,
For my salvation.

Lo, the Good Shepherd for the sheep is offered;
The slave hath sinned, and the Son hath suffered;
For our atonement, while he nothing heedeth,
God intercedeth.

Therefore, kind Jesus, since I cannot pay Thee,
I do adore Thee, and will ever pray Thee,
Think on Thy pity and Thy love unswerving,
Not my deserving.

http://www.songsandhymns.org/hymns/lyrics/ah-holy-jesus-how-hast-thou-offended


A Poem for Good Friday – Amy Carmichael: Lest We Forget

April 18, 2014

I’ve been re-reading a bunch of Amy Carmichael’s poetry from her books Toward Jerusalem, and Mountain Breezes, this Lent.  Here’s one of her poems that’s appropriate for Good Friday.  I particularly like the last line… it reminds me to pray for those who are lost and wandering, that they would find their home, rest and joy in Christ.  How incredible that Christ’s pain was for our joy, and His death became our life – fullness of life for now and eternity.

Home of our hearts, lest we forget
What our redemption meant to Thee,
Let our most reverent thoughts be set
Upon Thy Calvary.

We, when we suffer, turn and toss
And seek for ease, and seek again;
But Thou upon Thy bitter cross
Wast firmly fixed in pain.

And in our night star-clusters shine,
Flowers comfort us, and joy of song;
No star, no flower, no song was Thine,
But darkness three hours long.

We in our lesser mystery,
Of lingering ill, and winged death,
Would fain see clear; but could we see,
What need would be for faith?

O Lord beloved, Thy Calvary
Stills all our questions. Come, oh come,
Where children wandering wearily
Have not yet found their home.

Amy Carmichael, Rose from Briar, page 46


Good Friday related entries from the King’s English blog

April 18, 2014

As I did yesterday for Maundy Thursday, I thought many of our readers would appreciate have the links to various of the entries at the King’s English blog from past years that are tied to Scriptures related to Good Friday.

My kingdom is not of this world – John 18:36

Crucify him, crucify him – Luke 23:21

Pilate washed his hands – Matthew 27:24

Crown of thorns – Matthew 27:29

Hail King of the Jews – Matthew 27:29

Father, forgive them they know not what they do – Luke 23:34

Gave up the ghost – John 19:30

It is finished – John 19:30


Patrick Comerford’s Sermons on the Seven Last Words of Christ on the Cross

April 18, 2014

In 2011, the Rev. Patrick Comerford posted a series of seven sermons at his blog on the seven last words of Christ.  They are meaty and worth savoring if you can take the time:

Seven Last Words (1): ‘Father, forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing’

Seven Last Words (2): ‘Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in Paradise’

Seven Last Words (3): ‘Woman, here is your son … Here is your mother’

Seven Last Words (4): ‘My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?’

Seven Last Words (5): ‘I am thirsty’

Seven Last Words (6): ‘It is finished’

Seven Last Words (7): ‘Father, into your hands I commend my spirit’


Good Friday 2014 around the blogosphere

April 18, 2014

(entries in bold are particularly recommended!)

Anglican Mainstream:  Good Friday, and O Sacred Head Sore Wounded (Kings College Cambridge)

Angliverse: Original Poems for Good Friday by Teresa Roberts Johnson

Biola’s Lent Project:  Good Friday entry, including portion of Bach Mass in B Minor

Cranmer:  Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit

Desiring God: It Is Finished (Good Friday)

Give Us This Day:  A reflection on 1 Peter 2:11-25

Godspace (Christine Sine): Prayers for Good Friday 2014

Kendall Harmon’s Holy Week posts at TitusOneNine (TOO MUCH good stuff here to link! Go browse…)

Patrick Comerford: Art for Lent (45): ‘Christ of Saint John of the Cross’ (1951), by Salvador Dalí

Prydain:  For Holy Week: Annie Moses Band performs “Were You There?”

Scotty Smith:  A Prayer for Good Friday

Trevin Wax:  The Multifaceted Diamond of Christ’s Atoning Work

Trinity School for Ministry:  The Weight of Redemption

***

A few links from here at Lent & Beyond:

Lent & Beyond Good Friday category

Lent & Beyond: Compilation of Good Friday Poems

Lent & Beyond: Compilation of Good Friday entries (devotionals, music, prayers, quotes, etc.) from 2007 – 2013


A Hymn for Good Friday #2: O Love Divine, What Hast Thou Done

April 18, 2014

A wonderful hymn by Charles Wesley that is new to me…  I’m so thankful these are not mere words, but TRUTH.

O Love divine, what hast thou done!
The immortal God hath died for me!
The Father’s co-eternal Son
Bore all my sins upon the tree.
Th’immortal God for me hath died:
My Lord, my love, is crucified!

Is crucified for me and you,
To bring us rebels back to God.
Believe, believe the record true,
Ye all are bought with Jesus’ blood.
Pardon for all flows from His side:
My Lord, my love, is crucified!

Behold and love, ye that pass by,
The bleeding Prince of life and peace!
Come, sinners, see your Savior die,
And say, Was ever grief like His?
Come, feel with me His blood applied:
My Lord, my love, is crucified!

Then let us sit beneath His cross,
And gladly catch the healing stream:
All things for Him account but loss,
And give up all our hearts to Him:
Of nothing think or speak beside,
My Lord, my love, is crucified!


GOOD FRIDAY 2014

April 18, 2014

Good FridayTo minimize clutter on the home page today, I’ve unstickied our two Lent & Holy Week featured posts that have been at the top of the blog throughout Lent.  Here are the links.  Lent & Holy Week Resources & Links (L&B)Lent Devotional links 2014 (links to other sites).

All our Good Friday entries are here.

Our Compilation of Good Friday poems, quotes, prayers, devotionals is here.

 art credit


One Brutal Death…. today’s Good Friday devotional from Desiring God

April 18, 2014


It is Friday, April 3, A.D. 33. It is the darkest day in human history, though most humans have no clue of this. In Rome, Tiberius attends to the demanding business of the empire. Throughout the inhabited world, babies are born, people eat and drink, marry and are given in marriage, barter in marketplaces, sail merchant ships, and fight battles. Children play, old women gossip, young men lust, and people die.

But today one death, one brutal, gruesome death, the worst and best of all human deaths will leave upon the canvas of human history the darkest brushstroke. In Jerusalem, God the Son, the Creator of all that is (John 1:3), will be executed. […]

One last move. Pilate tries to persuade the Sanhedrin to release Jesus. One last block and trap. “If you release this man, you are not Caesar’s friend. Everyone who makes himself a king opposes Caesar” (John 19:12). The Council has Pilate where they want him: cornered. Checkmate.

And the triune God has the Council, Pilate, and Satan where he wants them. They would have no authority over the Son at all unless it had been given them from above (John 19:11). Fallen Jews, Gentiles and spiritual powers unwittingly collaborate in executing the only innocent death that could possibly grant the guilty life. Checkmate.

The Cross

Morning wanes as Jesus stumbles out of the Praetorium, horribly beaten and bleeding profusely. The Roman soldiers had been brutal in their creative cruelty. Thorns have ripped Jesus’s scalp and his back is one grotesque, oozing wound. Golgotha is barely a third of a mile through the Garden Gate, but Jesus has no strength to manage the forty-pound crossbar. Simon of Cyrene is drafted from the crowd.

Twenty-five minutes later, Jesus is hanging in sheer agony on one of the cruelest instruments of torture ever devised. […]

Go read the full entry at Desiring God.


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