Prayers and Resources – Praying for Muslims during Ramadan

This post will be sticky for a few days.  Look below for new entries.

 I’m so thankful that Jill has organized the prayer campaign for Mali during Ramadan!  Below are a few good resources for praying more broadly for Muslims and the Muslim world during Ramadan.   Please pray especially for those Christians who work among Muslims, that they will have many opportunities to share about Jesus’ love, grace and free gift of salvation during this month when Muslims are devoting themselves to fasting and trying to please God.

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Some prayer guidelines / ideas for Christians during Ramadan:

A great list of prayer topics.   Some Excerpts:

How Can We Pray During Ramadan?

Father, we pray that as they set their hearts to worship their god Allah, that You might make them to “know You, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom You have sent” (John 17:3). Help them see that Jesus is Your eternal Son through whom they can have eternal life.

Father, we pray that as their bodies hunger and their tongues thirst, that You would show them Jesus who promised “I am the bread of life; he who comes to Me will not hunger, and he who believes in Me will never thirst” (John 6:35). Help them see the insufficiency of their works and lead them to hunger and thirst for the righteousness that only Jesus can give.

Father, we pray that as they practice self-restraint that You would show them Jesus who, before He was crucified for sinners, denied Himself and “prayed, ‘My Father, if it is possible, may this cup be taken from Me. Yet not as I will, but as You will’” (Matthew 26:39). Help them believe that He truly died on the cross and drank fully from the cup of Your wrath.

Father, we pray that as they give alms to the poor that You would show them Jesus who “though He was rich, yet for your sake He became poor, so that you through His poverty might become rich” (2 Corinthians 8:9). Help them see and treasure the eternal glory of Your Son Jesus.

Father, we pray that as they gather together to feast in the evening, that You would show them Jesus who invites sinners of all sorts to abandon their false gods and by faith join “those who are invited to the marriage supper of the Lamb” (Revelation 16:9). Show them the resurrected and ascended King of Glory who desires them to draw near to Him in faith.

THERE’S MORE – Go read the full entry here.

(H/T Anglicans Ablaze)

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30 Days of Prayer Booklet / and Resources from the Global Prayer Resource Network Website:

There is an excellent 30 Days Prayer Guide which offers prayer suggestions for Muslim peoples and countries each day of Ramadan.  The 30 Days website gives information on ordering / downloading the full 52 page booklet, as well as providing wonderful past articles and prayer topics for Muslim people groups.

[Note there is a children’s version of the 30 Days booklet available]

You can view an abdridged version of the daily entries using this link (click on the number for each day at the top of the page);

The Global Prayer Resource Website also has daily Ramadan prayer points available for various peoples and countries.  See the links for each week of Ramadan below:

Ramadan Week 1

In the next few days we will be praying for the Tuareg, in the Saharan parts of Niger and Mali;  the Maldives a collection of 1,190 coral reef islands in the Indian Ocean and the Muslims of Bosnia-Herzegovina.  

We will also pray for Child Marriages in Yemen and then we have prayer points for Palestine, Algeria and Indonesia.

To view each day’s brief entry, click on the link for each week below.

Week 1Week 2Week 3Week 4Week 5

If it’s easier, the page all the links for each week is here.

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Open Doors:

Open Doors, a ministry focused on mobilizing prayer and support for persecuted believers has a free short Ramadan Prayer Guide which contains brief descriptions and prayer points for 30 Muslim countries.

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 The PrayerCast website is featuring a number of prayer videos during Ramadan:

A prayer video focused on the “Sons of Ishmael” – stunning video of Muslim peoples and scenery from Muslim countries throughout the world – helpful for those who find visual images helpful for stimulating prayer.  Focused on prayer that the Children of Hagar, the Sons of Ishmael would drink of Jesus’ living water.

During Ramadan Week 1: Praying for Somalia

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Whatever resources you use, please DO pray during Ramadan that the Father would draw many Muslims to Jesus during this month!

 

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6 Responses to Prayers and Resources – Praying for Muslims during Ramadan

  1. Garth Bulmer says:

    Dear Lent and Beyond,

    Todays prayers for Ramadan upset me very much. I made a comment once before so it is clear that I do not come from the same theological perspective as soon of your authors- and that is fine. And, I also appreciate much that you send me

    But todays prayers for Ramadan which plead for the conversion fof the Muslims are unworthy of Our Lord Jesus Christ who repreatedly ( as does the OT) uses outsiders as agents of God;s love and compassion- most notably the Good Samaritan, the non-believer, who shows the compassion which not even the Levite could muster.

    I do not believe that Christianity contains all truth, just as Anglicanism has never claimed to be the true church. My lack of assurance that “we have all the truth and everybody should be like us” does not in any way detract from my conviction about the good news in Jesus Christ.

    But I do wonder, in a world torn apart by every kind of division, including sectarian extremism and violence, how you imagine that your prayers break down barriers. It is precisely this exclusivist attitude which frighten so many Christians about some expressions of Islam and I am dismayed to see it within my own tradition.

    To me, a prayer against another religion (people and culture) lacks in generosity and I have to wonder whether it represent the mind of Christ.

    It is obvious to me that other religions often explore aspects of the divine which Christianity does not or not deeply. Without betraying my loyalty to Jesus Christ, I believe that it is entirely appropriate for us to prayer for the well-being of persons and cultures different from ours and that through such prayers live the compassion for neighbour which Jesus taught How else can religion be a force for peace and justice in the world

    Thank you

    • Dear Garth,
      Thanks for sharing your concerns. I’d like to respectfully challenge a few things you wrote.

      First of all, the prayers for Ramadan are posted out of deep love for Muslims. And I don’t write that theoretically. I have hundreds of Muslim friends and share my daily life closely with Muslims. These are not prayers “against” Muslims, nor in any way trying to denigrate their culture or deny that there is truth or beauty and good in Muslim culture. To provide merely one example, I have been blessed by the incredible hospitality of my Muslim friends, and have learned much about hospitality and true sacrificial friendship (visiting the sick, caring for distant relatives, making time for others) from them.

      It is out of love for Muslims that I pray that they might find fullness of life in Jesus Christ. I am pained that my Muslim friends are trying to earn their salvation through their works of righteousness. I long for them to know the mercy and grace and free gift of salvation in Christ, to have assurance of forgiveness of sins and salvation. If Jesus words are true (as I believe they are!), and Jesus is the Bread of Life and the Living Water, if eternal life is in Him, how could I love someone and let them continue to eat dry crusts or drink stagnant muddy water when they’ve been invited to a FEAST?

      Perhaps I can use what you wrote about the parable of the Good Samaritan to provide an analogy. Yes, Jesus broke down ethnic and cultural barriers. He was not afraid to reach out to the outcasts and the despised. He honored the Samaritan in his parable, and he spoke to the Samaritan woman at the well, recognizing her dignity, answering her questions in spite of her reputation and her sin. But in loving and honoring Samaritans, Jesus also did not hesitate to speak the truth about Himself to the Samaritan woman or to challenge their beliefs when they were false or incomplete. Read again Jesus’ exchange with the Samaritan woman in John 4:

      The Samaritan woman said to him, “How is it that you, a Jew, ask for a drink from me, a woman of Samaria?” (For Jews have no dealings with Samaritans.) Jesus answered her, “If you knew the gift of God, and who it is that is saying to you, ‘Give me a drink,’ you would have asked him, and he would have given you living water.” The woman said to him, “Sir, you have nothing to draw water with, and the well is deep. Where do you get that living water? Are you greater than our father Jacob? He gave us the well and drank from it himself, as did his sons and his livestock.” Jesus said to her, “Everyone who drinks of this water will be thirsty again, but whoever drinks of the water that I will give him will never be thirsty again. The water that I will give him will become in him a spring of water welling up to eternal life.” The woman said to him, “Sir, give me this water, so that I will not be thirsty or have to come here to draw water.” Jesus said to her, “Go, call your husband, and come here.” The woman answered him, “I have no husband.” Jesus said to her, “You are right in saying, ‘I have no husband’; for you have had five husbands, and the one you now have is not your husband. What you have said is true.” The woman said to him, “Sir, I perceive that you are a prophet. Our fathers worshiped on this mountain, but you say that in Jerusalem is the place where people ought to worship.” Jesus said to her, “Woman, believe me, the hour is coming when neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem will you worship the Father. You worship what you do not know; we worship what we know, for salvation is from the Jews. But the hour is coming, and is now here, when the true worshipers will worship the Father in spirit and truth, for the Father is seeking such people to worship him. God is spirit, and those who worship him must worship in spirit and truth.” The woman said to him, “I know that Messiah is coming (he who is called Christ). When he comes, he will tell us all things.” Jesus said to her, “I who speak to you am he.”

      Jesus did not hesitatate to proclaim that what she knew and believed was incomplete, that there was something – SOMEONE! – greater. I think it provides a very good example of how to witness to Muslims. There is truth and beauty in their culture, and many are earnestly seeking God. I long for them to have the joy of finding God through Jesus, of being able to approach the Father with freedom and confidence to receive mercy because they trust in Christ’s work, His sacrifice, not their own efforts to be “good enough.”

      Thanks for reading, and I’m glad you find some of what we publish to be helpful.

      In Christ’s fellowship,
      Karen B. L&B founder

    • Garth, I just though of one additional comment I’d like to add as I reread what you wrote. It would be a very dull world indeed if “everyone were like us!” I love the diversity of cultures God created, and in fact, that’s one of the things I long for in heaven – to see the incredible beauty and richness as people from every tribe, tongue, people and nation worship Christ! Encouraging my Muslim friends to follow Jesus does NOT mean making someone like me. They don’t have to give up their culture or language. They don’t have to become “Anglicans” or be like American evangelicals. Following Jesus faithfully *WILL* mean standing against and opposing some of the things in their cultures that are sinful – as Jesus did in exposing the Jews’ hypocrisy and racism. How beautiful it will be one day in Heaven to see the beauty of each culture fully represented and perfected as all sin has been burned away and only what is good and pure and true and God-honoring remains!

      • Hi, Garth,
        I’d like to chime in. Jesus told us to judge a tree by the fruit it produces (Mt 7:15-19). In your mind, compare and contrast nations whose historical legacy is Hinduism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism. Even as imperfectly as we evangelical Christians live our faith, the goodness of our Lord still makes a significant difference to the ordering of the lives of the nations.

        Thanks for reading,
        Jill

  2. […] EXCELLENT resource I included in last year’s Ramadan Prayer Resource roundup:  Garrett Kell’s How Christians Can Pray for Muslim Friends During […]

  3. If we believe in JESUS,then we must believe in what He said,”I AM The Way,The Truth and The Life!No one comes to the FATHER except through Him.

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