Holy Saturday around the Blogosphere 2015

April 4, 2015

These links are in fairly random order…, but represent some of the good resources that are being posted today for Holy Saturday.

Lent & Beyond Holy Saturday entries  (several new entries posted already… more to come later)

Ohio Anglican:  Collect and Scripture readings for Holy Saturday

Biola Lent Project:  Devotional for Holy Saturday

Kendall Harmon:  A Prayer for Holy Saturday (I)

Kendall Harmon: The Sound of Perfect Silence

Anglican Mainstream: Meditation for Holy Saturday

Archbishop Cramner blog: Easter Eve: dead, buried, bereft

Trinity School for Ministry:  Holy Saturday Devotional

Godspace:  Even Resurrection Pauses For Sabbath Rest

Desiring God: He Descended into Hell? Holy Saturday

Prydain:  For Easter Eve: a reading from Augustine of Hippo

Give Us This Day (Fr. Charles Erlandson) – Easter Even – John 19:38-42

Emily Polis Gibson – Upon our Saviour’s Tomb, wherein never man was laid

Malcolm Guite – Check out his 14 Sonnets for the Stations of the Cross (especially sonnets 13 & 14)

Scotty Smith: A Prayer for Saturday of Holy Week

Patrick Comerford: Through Lent with Vaughan Williams (46): ‘Dona nobis pacem’ 6 ‘Dona nobis pacem’

Dean of Durham: Harrowing Hell: the significance of Easter Eve

Transfigurations:  Holy Saturday (Psalm 88)

Vicar’s Versicles: Holy Saturday – Meditate in Silence

A new poem from Teresa Roberts Johnson: To His Mother on Holy Saturday

Music for Holy Saturday:  I Called to God (Jonah 2:2-9) Patrick Schlabs

CT Magazine:  Sitting, Waiting, and Hoping in the Tomb of Jesus

Emily Polis Gibson:  Waiting in Hope, Brought to Our Senses

John Ortberg:  In between despair and joy

Cardiphonia:  The Canticle of Jonah for Holy Saturday.  (Also at Cardiphonia, check out several older entries including: Bruce Benedict’s original Holy Saturday hymn / poem:  “Death Tasted Hope in Christ’s last Breath,” and their compilation of Songs & Hyms for Holy Saturday)

Wow… I can’t ever remember seeing so many excellent and meaty reflections for Holy Saturday before…!  It’s been a blessing to have some time to read, reflect, and collate these devotionals and resources!

 


Links for Holy Saturday

April 4, 2015

Holy_Saturday

We’ve not traditionally blogged much on Holy Saturday, but here are some links to past entries and some good sites for those looking for prayers, music and devotionals.

All our Holy Saturday entries

***

Resources & Compilations

Poems for Holy Saturday

NEW: Holy Saturday around the Blogosphere 2015

Holy Saturday around the blogosphere (2014)

Kendall Harmon’s wealth of Holy Saturday entries

Holy Week: Index of Holy Week devotionals, prayers, quotes and resources here at Lent & Beyond

A collection of fantastic Holy Week Devotions from the Pontifications blog from 2004

More Pontifications Lent, Holy Week & Easter Devotionals (from 2005)

***

Quotes & Devotionals

NEW: Henri Nouwen on Holy Saturday “The Day of God’s Solitude”

NEW: “Life lock’d in death, heav’n in a shell!” – Henry Vaughan

Holy Saturday: Death has seized our Lord Jesus Christ; but shall not keep its hold on Life

WA Criswell: He is dead… He is dead… He is dead. Then, then then…

Lent Quotes: St. Cyril of Jerusalem – He vouchsafed salvation

Three Spiritual Classics for Holy Saturday (from the Pontifications blog archives)

A Homily from Saint Ephrem of Syria

***

Music & Poems

Poems for Holy Saturday

Palestrina: Lamentations for Holy Saturday, performed by the Tallis Scholars

Classic CCM for Holy Saturday into Easter: Christian Stephens’ The Descent, and Arise

A Classic CCM Song for Holy Saturday – He Holds the Keys (Steve Green)


Good Friday entries at Kendall Harmon’s TitusOneNine (2009 – 2015)

April 3, 2015

Rather than just linking to Kendall Harmon’s Holy Week category at TitusOneNine as I’ve been wont to do on Good Friday in past years, I thought it would be good if I did a round up of some of Kendall’s best Good Friday entries from today (so far) and years’ past…  As I did in last night’s Maundy Thursday roundup, I’ll post several prayers in full, and then post links to quotes, poems, music, sermon excerpts, etc.

A Prayer for Good Friday (I)

Lord Jesus Christ, who for the redemption of mankind didst ascend the cross, that thou mightest enlighten the world that lay in darkness: gather us this day with all they faithful to that same holy cross; that, gazing in penitence upon thy great sacrifice for us, we may be loosed from all our sins, and entering into the mystery of thy passion, be crucified to the vain pomp and power of this passing world; and finding our glory in the cross alone, we may attain at last thy everlasting glory, where thou, the lamb that once was slain, reignest with the Father and the Holy Spirit, one God for ever and ever. Amen.

A Prayer for Good Friday (II)

O Christ, who by the thorns pressed upon thy head hast drawn the thorns from the sorrows of this world, and given us a crown of joy and peace: Make us so bold as never to fear suffering, nor to suffer without cheerfulness in thy service; to the glory of thy holy name.

A Prayer for Good Friday (III)

Lord Christ, who didst enter into thy triumph by the hard and lonely way of the cross: May thy courage and steadfast loyalty, thy unswerving devotion to the Father’s will, inspire and strengthen us to tread firmly and with joy the road which love bids us to take, even if it leads through suffering, misunderstanding, and darkness. We ask it for thy sake, who for the joy that was set before thee endured the cross, despising the shame, O Lord, our strength and our Redeemer.

A Prayer for Good Friday (IV)

O God, whose blessed Son endured the loneliness and darkness of the cross, that we might enjoy eternal fellowship with thee: Grant that amidst life’s shadows we may know that we are never forsaken, but that we are ever walking in the light of thy countenance; through the same Jesus Christ our Lord.

A Prayer of William Temple

Lord Jesus Christ, who didst for me endure the horror of deep darkness, teach me by the depth of thine agony the vileness of my sin, and so bind me to thyself in bonds of gratitude and love that I may be united with thee in thy perfect sacrifice, my Saviour, my Lord, and my God.

A Prayer of John Wesley

O holy and ever-blessed Jesus, who being the eternal Son of God and most high in the glory of the Father, didst vouchsafe in love for us sinners to be born of a pure virgin, and didst humble thyself unto death, even the death of the cross : Deepen within us, we beseech thee, a due sense of thy infinite love; that adoring and believing in thee as our Lord and Saviour, we may trust in thy infinite merits, imitate thy holy example, obey thy commands, and finally enjoy thy promises; who with the Father and the Holy Ghost livest and reignest, one God, world without end.

And Another Good Friday Prayer

O holy and adorable Redeemer, by whose condemnation we are acquitted, by whose stripes we are healed, by whose death we have life, by whose cross we gain our crown: Keep us, we beseech thee, ever mindful of thy boundless love; and when thou dost call on us to bear for a while thy cross, like Simon of old, make us to rejoice that we are counted worthy to suffer for thy sake, and accept our feeble sacrifice, through the merits of thine eternal redemption. (W. E. Scudamore (Rector of Ditchingham and Fellow of Saint John’s College, Cambridge)

Still Another Good Friday Prayer

O God, the Father of mankind, who didst suffer thine only Son to be set forth as a spectacle despised, derided, and scornfully arrayed, yet in his humiliation to reveal his majesty: Draw us, we beseech thee, both to behold the Man and to worship the King, immortal, eternal, world without end. Amen.

A Prayer for Good Friday (IX)

Hear us, O merciful Lord, and remember now the hour in which thou didst commend thy blessed spirit into the hands of thy heavenly Father; and so assist us by this thy most precious death, that dying unto the world, we may live unto thee; and that at the hour of our departing from this mortal life, we may be received into thine everlasting kingdom, there to reign with thee, world without end.

A Prayer for Good Friday (VII)

Dear Lord, who hast blessed us with the gift of family life, that we may learn to love and care for others: We praise thee for the example of thy Son Jesus Christ, who even when deserted and betrayed by closest friends took thought for his mother and his disciple. Open our eyes to recognize in all men the claims of kinship, and stir our hearts to serve them as brethren called with us into the sonship of thy love.

A Prayer for Good Friday (VI)

Almighty and eternal God, who in thy great love didst give thine only Son to die for our sins, and for the sins of the whole world: Enable us, we beseech thee, by thy Holy Spirit, to worship thee with reverence, and meditate with humility upon those mighty acts by which thou didst bring redemption to thy people; through the same Jesus Christ our Lord.

***

Poems, Quotes, Sermon Excerpts…

***

MUSIC & SERMONS – Audio & Video links(I’m in the process of checking these links, not all may be working)


A few Good Friday Links

April 2, 2015

This post is sticky.  New entries follow below.   Note: the Lent 2015 Links post that was at the top of the blog is here, should you need access to those links.

Good FridayApologies that Lent devotional blogging has not been possible in recent weeks.  Here are a few Good Friday links that may be of interest:

Our Compilation of various Good Friday poems, quotes, prayers, devotionals

Poems for Good Friday

Good Friday 2014 around the blogosphere

Dr. Peter Toon’s 2004 Reflection on the Good Friday Collects

Good Friday 2014 Index – last year I took a three day Holy Week retreat, which allowed some time for posting a lot of Good Friday entries here at L&B.  This post has links to 15+ Good Friday entries posted last year.

***

Our Good Friday category is here should you want to browse through our past entries.  Here are several sub-categories & tags:


Great Resource: Bible in a Year blog from Church of the Advent

March 5, 2015

One of our recent Twitter followers is the Cathedral Church of the Advent in Birmingham Alabama, one of the largest and most vibrant orthodox Anglican parishes in the US.  In browsing their Twitter feed, I discovered a great resource at their website:  The Bible in a Year blog

Here’s the about page which explains the rationale and purpose for the blog

Here’s a PDF document outlining the reading plan

Currently they’re reading and blogging about 2 Kings.  It’s a resource that’s very worth bookmarking, especially for small group Bible studies perhaps looking for a discussion starter on a certain passage, or if you’d like to find commentary on one of today’s Lectionary readings.  By looking at the reading plan, and using the blog’s calendar feature you could find the commentary for Jeremiah 4 – 6 – covering today’s OT lesson from Jeremiah 4.

.


43 Poems for Lent – a complete index of Patrick Comerford’s 2012 blog series

February 20, 2015

We continue to get many dozens of visitors at L&B who are looking for Lent poems.  Last year I posted a compilation of some Lent poems, a compilation of Holy Week poemsGood Friday poems, and Easter poems.  All four compilations are somewhat rough, and I need to update them all, since I now have additional poems by Malcolm Guite, Teresa Roberts Johnson and others to add.

As a small beginning to continue to upgrade our liturgical-year-themed poetry resources here at L&B, I thought it would be helpful if I compiled a complete index of the Rev. Patrick Comerford’s Lent 2012 series of daily Lenten poems, one of the best-ever Lenten blog series, in my opinion! It was that series that really stirred up a fresh interest for me in liturgically-themed poetry.

(Patrick Comerford is a priest in the Church of Ireland (Anglican), Lecturer in Anglicanism and Liturgy in the Church of Ireland Theological Institute, Adjunct Assistant Professor in the University of Dublin (Trinity College Dublin) and a Canon of Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin.)

***

Poems for Lent (1): ‘Ash Wednesday’, TS Eliot

Poems for Lent (2): ‘Lent,’ George Herbert

Poems for Lent (3): ‘Indifference,’ by GA Studdert Kennedy

Poems for Lent (4): ‘Lenten Thoughts of a High Anglican,’ by John Betjeman

Poems for Lent (5): ‘Marked by Ashes,’ by Walter Brueggemann

Poems for Lent (6): ‘The Retreat,’ by Henry Vaughan

Poems for Lent (7): ‘Lent’ by Christina Rossetti

Poems for Lent (8): ‘Amen,’ by Leonard Cohen

Poems for Lent (9): ‘Sunday Morning, King’s Cambridge,’ by John Betjeman

Poems for Lent (10): ‘The Absence,’ by RS Thomas

Poems for Lent (11): ‘Untitled (The Fallen Angels left all there),’ by Patrick Kavanagh

Poems for Lent (12): ‘Forest Song,’ by Sir Shane Leslie

Poems for Lent (13): ‘Evensong,’ by CS Lewis

Poems for Lent (14): ‘In the Street,’ by Winifred M Letts

Poems for Lent (15): ‘Desert Places,’ by Robert Frost

Poems for Lent (16): ‘Lenten Communion,’ by Katharine Tynan

Poem for Lent (17): ‘Autobiography,’ by Louis MacNeice

Poems for Lent (18): ‘Christians and Pagans,’ by Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Poems for Lent (19): ‘Confession’ (‘O What a cunning guest’), by George Herbert

Poems for Lent (20): ‘Christ’s Bloody Sweat’ by Robert Southwell

Poems for Lent (21): ‘Holy Cross,’ by Sir Shane Leslie

Poems for Lent (22): ‘St Patrick’s Day with Neil,’ by Thomas McCarthy

Poem for Lent (23): ‘Sunday Morning,’ by Louis MacNeice

Poems for Lent (24): ‘Man of the House,’ by Katherine Tynan

Poems for Lent (25): ‘The Snowdrop Monument (in Lichfield Cathedral)’ by Jean Ingelow

Poems for Lent (26): ‘Mid-Lent,’ by Christina Rossetti

Poems for Lent (27): ‘I saw the Sun at Midnight,’ by Joseph Mary Plunkett

Poems for Lent (28): ‘Barnfloor and Winepress,’ by Gerard Manley Hopkins

Poems for Lent (29): ‘Here It Is,’ by Leonard Cohen

Poems for Lent (30): ‘Fifth Sunday In Lent’ by John Keble

Poems for Lent (31): ‘Annunciation,’ by John Donne

Poems for Lent (32): ‘What the Thunder said,’ from ‘The Waste Land’ by TS Eliot

Poems for Lent (33): ‘Affliction’ by George Herbert

Poems for Lent (34): ‘Julian at the Mysteries’ by CP Cavafy

Poems for Lent (35): ‘It is a thing most wonderful,’ by William Walsham How

Poems for Lent (36): ‘Batter my heart, three person’d God’ by John Donne

Poems for Lent (37): ‘The Donkey,’ by GK Chesterton

Poems for Lent (38): ‘Sonnet written in Holy Week at Genoa,’ by Oscar Wilde

Poems for Lent (39): ‘All in an April Evening,’ by Katharine Tynan

Poems for Lent (40): ‘I see His Blood Upon the Rose,’ by Joseph Mary Plunkett

Poems for Lent (41): ‘The Last Supper,’ by Ranier Maria Rilke

Poems for Lent (42): ‘Good Friday, 1613, Riding Westward,’ by John Donne

Poems for Lent (43): ‘Sepulchre,’ by George Herbert

***

Note: We had previously compiled a list of 7 Easter poems posted by Patrick Comerford in 2012.

You’ll find all our Lent poem posts and resources here.  (Right now it’s a small collection, but I expect it to grow this Lent!).  I expect to soon break up the “Poems, Hymns and Songs” category into two or three separate categories to separate poetry from music.


Bp. John Guernsey – Praying for Persecuted Christians in Lent AND Praying for the Terrorists who persecute them

February 19, 2015

Bishop John Guernsey of the ACNA Mid-Atlantic Diocese has written a Lenten letter calling for sacrificial prayer for persecuted believers around the world.  In a startling twist however, he is ALSO urging believers to pray for the terrorists who persecute them, and he has linked to a very helpful resource to help us pray, as well as providing some suggested ways of praying.

This Lenten season is a time of renewal of our spiritual disciplines of prayer, reading and studying Scripture, fasting, sacrificial giving of our money and our time for the sake of others.

Especially during this season, would you commit to making prayer for our persecuted brothers and sisters a central part of your devotions? Would you pray more earnestly for their witness and for their deliverance? Would you pray for God to turn even these acts of evil for his Kingdom purposes?

And would you pray for the terrorists themselves to repent and turn to Christ? Did you know there’s even a website where you can find profiles of terrorists so you can adopt one and commit to pray for him to repent and come to Christ. It’s Adopt a Terrorist for Prayer.

The site offers insightful suggestions as to how to pray for a terrorist. I’m praying for Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi, the head of ISIS, to repent and turn to Christ. So I’m using the Adopt a Terrorist for Prayer guide to intercede for him, praying…

  • for irresistible pursuit by God’s Spirit: “Holy Spirit, relentlessly pursue Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi to the depths of his hideout, that he may not escape your grace.”
  • for powerful demonstrations of God’s grace: “Lord, expose Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi to the precious testimony of Jesus’ followers.”
  • for vulnerability: “Dear God, strip from Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi all his defenses that he may turn to Jesus for hope and salvation.”
  • for conviction of sin and sense of shame: “Jesus, confront and overwhelm Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi with his shameful deeds and sinful nature till he becomes desperate for righteousness from you.”
  • for God’s honor: “God, may the redemption of Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi clearly display your character and glory.”
  • against spiritual blindness and bondage: “Lord, release Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi from Satan’s grip and open him to sense and know your grace in Jesus.”

Our God is mighty to save. Let’s cry out to him this Lent (and beyond!) for justice for his precious children.

From here

***

Update:  Just after I posted this, I recalled that I had seen a link earlier this week to a post at Desiring God about praying for our enemies.  I went and dug it up.  It’s a very challenging article by John Piper:  Pray for those who abuse you.  It’s worth prayerful reading, and it makes a powerful double punch when combined with Bp. Guernsey’s letter.


Bishop Julian Dobbs – Lent Bible Study Video series on Vimeo

February 19, 2015

Thanks to a link posted by Pat Dague at Incline Your Heart, I just discovered that Bishop Julian Dobbs of the ACNA is posting a Lenten Bible Study Series on Vimeo:  “What Happens After We Die”

Here’s how the Rev. Matt Kennedy at Church of the Good Shepherd described the series:

Bishop Dobbs has begun a Lenten video teaching series entitled: “What Happens After We Die”. In it he will discuss death, Hell, Heaven, and the Resurrection. The first video deals with the biblical concept of “Hades”. The series is expositional, grounded in the Scriptures, so you’ll need your Bible as you watch and listen.

Here’s the link to Bishop Dobbs’ Vimeo page so you can watch all the episodes.


Lent activities for children and families – favorite links

February 19, 2015

I regret that I’ve had little time to be able to dig for new resources to recommend for children / families or Sunday School lessons during Lent.  We always have MANY visitors to our blog looking for those.  This year, I’ve just not had the time to put together any new resource compilations for family activities.

But here are a few old favorites, which I’ve checked to make sure the links are still working:

From Catechist’s Journey – an excellent Roman Catholic site:

***

Fridge Art:  Family Activities for celebrating Lent & Easter

Fridge Art:  The Lenten Cross – a Lenten version of a “Jesse Tree” with a reading and a symbol for each day of Lent.

There is also a shorter similar 12-day activity – “The Easter Tree” from the FridgeArt site.

***

Christine Sine at Godspace has put together a good compilation of Lent links for 2015, including a number of compilations for children & families:

***

From here at Lent & Beyond:  one of our most popular posts of all-time is from 2010

Lent and Ash Wednesday Activity Ideas for Families

also, our 2014 entry: Resources for Celebrating Holy Week with Kids

Our Lent: Children & Families category has more links

***

As always, we invite our readers to share your favorite links & resources in the comments, thanks!


Anglican Mainstream’s Lent Meditations for 2015

February 19, 2015

Yesterday I did not know for sure whether Anglican Mainstream would be posting daily Lent reflections this year.

The answer is YES they are…

Here’s the link

Here’s an excerpt from today’s entry for Feb. 19:

Lent is an opportunity to consider the truth of the Gospel as rooted in the Cross of Christ, (which is not necessarily a popular message). The idea that we are called to give up ourselves, our own will and power, is a message that goes against the Gospel of the culture. Lent is a season to learn through the spiritual disciplines that to die to self and the world, and to live our life in the fullness of God is a witness to a broken and needy world.

PRAYER OF THE DAY: Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, You have suffered death on the Cross for our sins. Oh, Holy Cross of Jesus, be my true light! Oh, Holy Cross, fill my soul with good thoughts.
Oh, Holy Cross, ward off from me all things that are evil. Oh, Holy Cross, ward off from me all dangers and deaths and give me life everlasting! Oh, Crucified Jesus of Nazareth, have mercy on me now and forever.

ANCIENT WISDOM/PRESENT GRACE:  “Since we are bound to abhor any deception which hides the truth from our sight, we must of necessity repudiate any direct relationship with the things of this world–and that for the sake of Christ. Wherever a group, be it large or small, prevents us from standing alone before Christ, wherever such a group raises a claim of immediacy it must be hated for the sake of Christ. For every immediacy, whether we realize it or not, means hatred of Christ, and this is especially true where such relationships claim the sanctions of Christian principles.”– Dietrich Bonhoeffer, from “The Cost of Discipleship.


Lent Prayer Challenge 2015 – 40 daily prayers for missionaries serving among the least-reached people groups

February 18, 2015

The evangelical mission agency Christar has put together a very nice list of prayer suggestions for use in Lent 2015 – key prayer requests, one per day, for missionaries serving among unreached / least-reached people groups around the world, including those in “creative access” countries where traditional missions work is not allowed, and where risk of persecution is high.

If you know any missionaries, it would make a great Lenten discipline to use this list to shape your prayers for them during Lent.

Throughout Lent, we will routinely Tweet about people groups and countries needing prayer, the persecuted church, and issues of religous freedom.


Lent 2015 – some recommended links

February 18, 2015

This post is sticky. Look below for new entries.

  • Biola University’s Lent Project site.  So good.  HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.  Meaty reflections on Scripture, accompanied by visual art and music.  It’s such a treat, and really good “soul food.”
  • Barnstorming blog.  YAY!  Emily Polis Gibson is once again posting Lent reflections.  Her photos and poetry and reflections make this a great site for spiritual encouragement. One of my favorite blogs year round, but especially during Advent & Lent.

Read the rest of this entry »


40 Days for Life

February 18, 2015

This year’s 40 Days for Life campaign commences today.

Matthew 5:43-44 (ESV)
“You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you.

Our Father in heaven,
We bless the abortionists in the United States. You know their needs far better than we. Bless them inside and out, upside and down, in every dimension and every realm, seen and unseen. Amen.


Lots of good Lent resources via our Twitter feed

February 17, 2015

I haven’t (yet) had time to compile a blog post with list of Lent resources for 2015. I hope to get to it before I call it a night on the computer, but a few work tasks must be finished first.  In the meantime, I’ve tweeted about quite a number of good Lent resources today.  You can find all those tweets by browsing our Twitter feed.

Also: Our list of some highly recommended Lent links from last year is here.


Lent Links on our Sidebar

February 13, 2015

With Lent looming, I’ve moved our sidebar list of Lent links & resources to the top category of all the links on our sidebar (i.e. just below the calendar, the twitter feed, the list of “most viewed” posts, and the category box).

I verified and updated most of those links last year in 2014.  I’ll try to do some additional verification and updating of the links this weekend as well.  But in the meantime, I hope they will be a helpful resource.

Please let us know in the comments if you find any broken links, have any recommendations, or if there’s some Lent resource you’re trying to find which we may be able to help you with!


%d bloggers like this: