Music for Lent. At the Cross – by Keith and Kristyn Getty, Graham Kendrick

February 24, 2015

Here is a brand new song by Keith Getty, Kristyn Getty and Graham Kendrick.  It makes a great declaration for Lent: I will be satisfied in Christ and trust His worth, not my own righteousness.  Below the lyrics, I’ve excerpted a portion of Graham Kendrick’s reflection on the thoughts which inspired the song.

At the Cross (My Worth is Not in What I Own)

My worth is not in what I own
Not in the strength of flesh and bone
But in the costly wounds of love
At the cross

My worth is not in skill or name
In win or lose, in pride or shame
But in the blood of Christ that flowed
At the cross

Refrain:
I rejoice in my Redeemer
Greatest Treasure,
Wellspring of my soul
I will trust in Him, no other.
My soul is satisfied in Him alone.

As summer flowers we fade and die
Fame, youth and beauty hurry by
But life eternal calls to us
At the cross

I will not boast in wealth or might
Or human wisdom’s fleeting light
But I will boast in knowing Christ
At the cross

Refrain
Two wonders here that I confess
My worth and my unworthiness
My value fixed – my ransom paid
At the cross

Refrain

By Keith Getty, Kristyn Getty, and Graham Kendrick
Copyright © 2014 Getty Music Publishing and Make Way Music,
http://www.grahamkendrick.co.uk

In writing about the inspiration for the song, Graham Kendrick writes:

We know that our culture calibrates human worth by measures of wealth and status, skills and achievement, beauty and youth, power and so on, but we don’t always appreciate how deeply those values are ingrained into us and how effective they are in driving our behaviour. Christians are little different. We need to sing about our worth from God’s perspective, not ours or our cultures, and God’s perspective centres in on the cross.

John Stott wrote; ‘Our self is a complex entity of good and evil, glory and shame, of creation and fall…we are created, fallen and redeemed, then re-created in God’s image’ ….. ‘Standing before the cross we see simultaneously our worth and unworthiness, since we perceive both the greatness of his love in dying, and the greatness of our sin in causing him to die’ [The Cross p. 285]

William Temple wrote: ‘My worth is what I am worth to God, and that is a marvellous great deal, for Christ died for me’

Read the full story behind the song here

Go to www.gettymusic.com for sheet music, tutorial video and more


43 Poems for Lent – a complete index of Patrick Comerford’s 2012 blog series

February 20, 2015

We continue to get many dozens of visitors at L&B who are looking for Lent poems.  Last year I posted a compilation of some Lent poems, a compilation of Holy Week poemsGood Friday poems, and Easter poems.  All four compilations are somewhat rough, and I need to update them all, since I now have additional poems by Malcolm Guite, Teresa Roberts Johnson and others to add.

As a small beginning to continue to upgrade our liturgical-year-themed poetry resources here at L&B, I thought it would be helpful if I compiled a complete index of the Rev. Patrick Comerford’s Lent 2012 series of daily Lenten poems, one of the best-ever Lenten blog series, in my opinion! It was that series that really stirred up a fresh interest for me in liturgically-themed poetry.

(Patrick Comerford is a priest in the Church of Ireland (Anglican), Lecturer in Anglicanism and Liturgy in the Church of Ireland Theological Institute, Adjunct Assistant Professor in the University of Dublin (Trinity College Dublin) and a Canon of Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin.)

***

Poems for Lent (1): ‘Ash Wednesday’, TS Eliot

Poems for Lent (2): ‘Lent,’ George Herbert

Poems for Lent (3): ‘Indifference,’ by GA Studdert Kennedy

Poems for Lent (4): ‘Lenten Thoughts of a High Anglican,’ by John Betjeman

Poems for Lent (5): ‘Marked by Ashes,’ by Walter Brueggemann

Poems for Lent (6): ‘The Retreat,’ by Henry Vaughan

Poems for Lent (7): ‘Lent’ by Christina Rossetti

Poems for Lent (8): ‘Amen,’ by Leonard Cohen

Poems for Lent (9): ‘Sunday Morning, King’s Cambridge,’ by John Betjeman

Poems for Lent (10): ‘The Absence,’ by RS Thomas

Poems for Lent (11): ‘Untitled (The Fallen Angels left all there),’ by Patrick Kavanagh

Poems for Lent (12): ‘Forest Song,’ by Sir Shane Leslie

Poems for Lent (13): ‘Evensong,’ by CS Lewis

Poems for Lent (14): ‘In the Street,’ by Winifred M Letts

Poems for Lent (15): ‘Desert Places,’ by Robert Frost

Poems for Lent (16): ‘Lenten Communion,’ by Katharine Tynan

Poem for Lent (17): ‘Autobiography,’ by Louis MacNeice

Poems for Lent (18): ‘Christians and Pagans,’ by Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Poems for Lent (19): ‘Confession’ (‘O What a cunning guest’), by George Herbert

Poems for Lent (20): ‘Christ’s Bloody Sweat’ by Robert Southwell

Poems for Lent (21): ‘Holy Cross,’ by Sir Shane Leslie

Poems for Lent (22): ‘St Patrick’s Day with Neil,’ by Thomas McCarthy

Poem for Lent (23): ‘Sunday Morning,’ by Louis MacNeice

Poems for Lent (24): ‘Man of the House,’ by Katherine Tynan

Poems for Lent (25): ‘The Snowdrop Monument (in Lichfield Cathedral)’ by Jean Ingelow

Poems for Lent (26): ‘Mid-Lent,’ by Christina Rossetti

Poems for Lent (27): ‘I saw the Sun at Midnight,’ by Joseph Mary Plunkett

Poems for Lent (28): ‘Barnfloor and Winepress,’ by Gerard Manley Hopkins

Poems for Lent (29): ‘Here It Is,’ by Leonard Cohen

Poems for Lent (30): ‘Fifth Sunday In Lent’ by John Keble

Poems for Lent (31): ‘Annunciation,’ by John Donne

Poems for Lent (32): ‘What the Thunder said,’ from ‘The Waste Land’ by TS Eliot

Poems for Lent (33): ‘Affliction’ by George Herbert

Poems for Lent (34): ‘Julian at the Mysteries’ by CP Cavafy

Poems for Lent (35): ‘It is a thing most wonderful,’ by William Walsham How

Poems for Lent (36): ‘Batter my heart, three person’d God’ by John Donne

Poems for Lent (37): ‘The Donkey,’ by GK Chesterton

Poems for Lent (38): ‘Sonnet written in Holy Week at Genoa,’ by Oscar Wilde

Poems for Lent (39): ‘All in an April Evening,’ by Katharine Tynan

Poems for Lent (40): ‘I see His Blood Upon the Rose,’ by Joseph Mary Plunkett

Poems for Lent (41): ‘The Last Supper,’ by Ranier Maria Rilke

Poems for Lent (42): ‘Good Friday, 1613, Riding Westward,’ by John Donne

Poems for Lent (43): ‘Sepulchre,’ by George Herbert

***

Note: We had previously compiled a list of 7 Easter poems posted by Patrick Comerford in 2012.

You’ll find all our Lent poem posts and resources here.  (Right now it’s a small collection, but I expect it to grow this Lent!).  I expect to soon break up the “Poems, Hymns and Songs” category into two or three separate categories to separate poetry from music.


Ginny Owens: When the Time is Right

December 22, 2014

One of my favorite contemporary Advent songs.  Ginny Owen’s song “When the Time is Right” captures well the waiting, longing and hope in God’s promises.

Unfortunately the song is not available as a download.  It’s from an album called One Silent Night, released in 2000, a compilation of Christmas songs by various artists.
When the time is right
The sun showed no mercy on the African sand,
another week with no clouds in the sky.
Only days filled with chains and Pharaoh’s commands.
The children of God looked to heaven on high.
They’d cry, “Lord, see our tears; tell us how long.”
Then they’d sing themselves to sleep with this song:
We are not forgotten; we are ever in God’s sight.
He will come to us when the time is right!
He will lead us into freedom;
He will lead us into life!
He will come to us when the time is right!
Centuries go by, and again there are tears.
Now the nation’s held in Caesar’s reign.
There’s a hope that their hearts
have held through the years
and as they sing that familiar refrain,
the answer that came down from heaven’s throne
offered freedom from a bondage far greater than Rome!
We are not forgotten; we are ever in God’s sight.
He will come to us when the time is right!
He will lead us into freedom;
He will lead us into life!
He will come to us when the time is right!
When the time is right!
Ginny Owens – 2000

Advent Poems: William Cowper – The Shining Light

December 18, 2014

Another post dug up from our 2006 archives…, an Advent favorite that I’m surprised has taken me 8 years to post over here at this version of Lent & Beyond!

William Cowper: The Shining Light

The Shining Light

My former hopes are fled,
My terror now begins;
I feel, alas! that I am dead
In trespasses and sins.
Ah, whither shall I fly?
I hear the thunder roar;
The Law proclaims Destruction nigh,
And Vengeance at the door.
When I review my ways,
I dread impending doom:
But sure a friendly whisper says,
“Flee from the wrath to come.”
I see, or think I see,
A glimmering from afar;
A beam of day, that shines for me,
To save me from despair.
Forerunner of the sun,
It marks the pilgrim’s way;
I’ll gaze upon it while I run,
And watch the rising day.

— William Cowper


An Unconventional Advent song: Michael W. Smith – I’ll Wait For You

December 15, 2014

Michael W. Smith’s song I’ll Wait for You from his 2010 album Wonder makes an excellent Advent video / song I think.  It focuses on holding on to our faith and hope in the midst of the world’s pain and brokenness.

Here are the lyrics:

“I’ll Wait For You”

Good morning Mr. Repo Man
Give me one more week, and I’ll be gone.
It’s been a long hard month of Sunday’s
Still no rain, nothing left around here but the dust and shame
I know you know….mmmm, I know you know.
And I’m trying to find my way, to hold on to my faith
While I wait, for you
I’ll wait for you.
Now I lie awake at night, trying not to think
these are the hardest times I’ve seen
I’m still holding on
I know you never said it would be easy
all thick and no thin, but the man who waits is the man who wins, holding on,
oh yeah, I’m holding on.I’m gonna hide myself away, hide myself away,
And I’ll wait for you, I’ll wait for you, I’ll wait for you,I’ll wait for you.

I need you now, I need you now, Oh, oh..oh..
You know I need you now, oh, oh, yeah, yeah

And I’ll wait for you, I’ll wait for you, I’m gonna wait for you,
Oh, I wait for you.

I’m gonna walk on and not get weary now, I’m gonna run and not fall down.
I know that someday, I’ll get my wings somehow, and you will carry me. you will carry me
I’m gonna rise up, like an eagle now, I’m gonna ride that big blue sky,
I’m sure that someday, all that doubt again, you will carry me, you will carry me, even now.
Carry me even now. Your gonna carry me, you will carry me, you will carry me, even now.
Oh carry me, oh yeah.


An Advent Poem – The Curse Undone, by Teresa Roberts Johnson

December 12, 2014

I posted the first poem in this two poem series yesterday.  This is from Teresa Roberts Johnson’s poetry blog, Angliverse.

The Curse Undone

Hiding their faces from the evening sun,
They stood ashamed among the shuddering trees
And heard the bidding voice of God, the One
Whose judgment brought the sinners to their knees.

“You will give life, but mingled with deep woe,”
He said to Eve, who sold her children into war
With him who on his belly now must go,
His fangs poised for destruction near and far.

To Adam, careless watchman, God then said,
“And you will earn your food by toil and sweat,
The dirt shall thwart your quest for daily bread,
While children doomed for death you shall beget.”

But of the woman’s pain a Seed would come
Just at the moment of earth’s darkest night.
This promised Seed to sin could not succumb,
The Second Adam, who all wrongs would right.

For He would freely give Himself for food,
The Bread of Life to take the curse away.
His agony the grieving world renewed
As death gave way to life at break of day.

Copyright © 2014 by Teresa Roberts Johnson (All rights reserved)

Please click here for the poet’s notes and commentary on the poem.


An Advent Poem: The Advent of Grace by Teresa Roberts Johnson

December 11, 2014

Anglican poet Teresa Roberts Johnson has two wonderful original Advent poems at her blog Angliverse this year.  They are theologically rich soul food and I’ve enjoyed meditating on them.  Here is the first poem.  I will post the second tomorrow.   Please make sure to click on the link at the end to read Theresa’s information on what inspired the poem.

The Advent of Grace

The sibilant voice poured pride into her soul
While her protector, silent, shirked his role.
The perfect garden at her feet, Eve reached
To pluck forbidden fruit, and thus she breached
The kind decree that promised life and breath,
And opened up her home to pain and death.
For when she said, “Take, eat,” and Adam took,
The curse unfurled, and seas and mountains shook.
Their stolen meal brought famine yet unknown,
Dearth earned for taking what is God’s alone.
The outlaws hid, believing all was lost,
Their eyes now open to the dreadful cost
Of plundering God’s throne, for with that hand
They had instead laid waste to Earth’s fair land.
Still worse, they had estranged themselves from Love,
But God took pity on them from above.
At His appointed time, His Word rang out
To say, “Where are you?” and to bring about
Undoing of the curse that fell upon their head,
Of pain in birth and sweat poured out for bread.
The garden lay in ruins many a year,
Till Advent bells rang out unbridled cheer.
For the power and the glory man had sought
Rest in the Man whose blood their lives has bought.
He freely left His throne to seek and save
The lost; God’s Son was traded for the knave.

Copyright © 2014 by Teresa Roberts Johnson (All rights reserved)

Please click here for some commentary on the poem.

 


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 398 other followers