Music for Good Friday- John Michael Talbot- Prayer Before the Cross

April 3, 2015

One of my favorite worship songs – a musical prayer – just played in my Good Friday playlist.  I’m spending the evening listening to music focused on the Cross.  I thought I’d share this here since it’s from an older album that may not be so widely known or played these days.
Troubador

(John Michael Talbot,  from Troubadour of the Great King, 1981.  iTunes link)

We adore You, most holy Lord
Jesus Christ, Lord Jesus Christ
As we gather together in this place
And throughout all the world

We worship You, Lord
We adore you, Oh Lord
And we bless Your holy name
For by Your cross
You have redeemed us
You have redeemed all the world


Two Worship Songs for a Maundy Thursday evening

April 17, 2014

Two worship songs I’ve been listening to this evening and thought others might appreciate.  They’ve helped me to worship the Lord for the gift of His body and His blood, for His willingness to be the sacrifice Lamb:

  • Stuart Townend’s “Behold the Lamb (Communion Hymn)” from his album There is Hope (Live), 2010.
  • Graham Kendrick’s “Come and See,” (featuring Faye Simpson), from the album The Very Best of Graham Kendrick – Knowing You Jesus, 2010

(There should be an embedded audio file and play arrow above, but WordPress has not always been displaying embedded music correctly lately.  If it does not show up, use these links: Behold the Lamb, Come and See,  but please respect the copyright and purchase the songs if you intend to keep them.)

The lyrics follow below.  First some Scripture verses to reflect on:

But he was pierced for our transgressions;
he was crushed for our iniquities;
upon him was the chastisement that brought us peace,
and with his wounds we are healed.
All we like sheep have gone astray;
we have turned—every one—to his own way;
and the LORD has laid on him
the iniquity of us all.  (Isaiah 53:5-6 ESV)

So when Pilate saw that he was gaining nothing, but rather that a riot was beginning, he took water and washed his hands before the crowd, saying, “I am innocent of this man’s blood; see to it yourselves.” And all the people answered, “His blood be on us and on our children!” Then he released for them Barabbas, and having scourged Jesus, delivered him to be crucified.

Then the soldiers of the governor took Jesus into the governor’s headquarters, and they gathered the whole battalion before him. And they stripped him and put a scarlet robe on him, and twisting together a crown of thorns, they put it on his head and put a reed in his right hand. And kneeling before him, they mocked him, saying, “Hail, King of the Jews!” And they spit on him and took the reed and struck him on the head. And when they had mocked him, they stripped him of the robe and put his own clothes on him and led him away to crucify him.   (Matthew 27:24-31 ESV)

 ***

 

Behold the Lamb (Communion Hymn)  [See also Stuart Townend’s website]

by, Keith Getty , Stuart Townend , Kristyn Lennox Getty.  CCLI #: 5003372

Behold the Lamb who bears our sins away
Slain for us and we remember
The promise made that all who come in faith
Find forgivness at the cross

So we share in this bread of life
And we drink of His sacrifice
As a sign of our bonds of (peace)  (subsequent verses:  love, grace)
Around the table of the King

The body of our Saviour Jesus Christ
Torn for you eat and remember
The wounds that heal the death that brings us life
Paid the price to make us one

The blood that cleanses ev’ry stain of sin
Shed for you drink and remember
He drained death’s cup that all may enter in
To receive the life of God

And so with thankfulness and faith we rise
To respond and to remember
Our call to follow in the steps of Christ
As his body here on earth

Final Chorus:
As we share in His suffering,
We proclaim: Christ will come again!
And we’ll join in the feast of heaven
Around the table of the King.

 ***

Come and See (We Worship at Your Feet)

Come and see, come and see
Come and see the King of love
See the purple robe and crown of thorns he wears
Soldiers mock, rulers sneer
As he lifts the cruel cross
Lone and friendless now he climbs towards the hill

We worship at your feet
Where wrath and mercy meet
And a guilty world is washed
By love’s pure stream
For us he was made sin
Oh, help me take it in
Deep wounds of love cry out ‘Father, forgive’
I worship, I worship
The Lamb who was slain.

Come and weep, come and mourn
For your sin that pierced him there
So much deeper than the wounds of thorn and nail
All our pride, all our greed
All our fallenness and shame
And the Lord has laid the punishment on him

Man of heaven, born to earth
To restore us to your heaven
Here we bow in awe beneath
Your searching eyes
From your tears comes our joy
From your death our life shall spring
By your resurrection power we shall rise

Graham Kendrick
Copyright © 1989 Make Way Music,
http://www.grahamkendrick.co.uk


A Holy Week Worship Musical – Max Lucado He Chose the Nails

April 2, 2014

He_Chose_Nails_CDYesterday I posted about the Amazon special offer on Max Lucado’s excellent devotional book He Chose the Nails, and mentioned that when the book was first released in 2000, there was also an accompanying music CD released.  The CD is out of print and I cannot find many online versions of the songs, so I am uploading my original CD here for our readers enjoyment.

While I enjoy the whole CD, I most HIGHLY recommend tracks 10 – 15.  They are just OUTSTANDING, especially Track #12 Thread of Scarlet.  Don’t miss a chance to hear this truly wonderful worship song.

 


Gethsemane

April 5, 2012

Modern hymnwriters Keith & Kristyn Getty and Stuart Townend have written a powerful hymn for Maundy Thursday:  Gethsemane.  (Here’s an iTunes link for a version from Stuart Townend’s album Creation Sings)

Lyrics:

GETHSEMANE
To see the King of heaven fall
In anguish to His knees,
The Light and Hope of all the world
Now overwhelmed with grief.
What nameless horrors must He see,
To cry out in the garden:
Oh, take this cup away from me
Yet not my will but Yours,
Yet not my will but Yours.

To know each friend will fall away,
And heaven’s voice be still,
For hell to have its vengeful day
Upon Golgotha’s hill.
No words describe the Saviour’s plight –
To be by God forsaken
Till wrath and love are satisfied
And every sin is paid
And every sin is paid

What took Him to this wretched place,
What kept Him on this road?
His love for Adam’s cursed race,
For every broken soul.
No sin too slight to overlook,
No crime too great to carry,
All mingled in this poisoned cup ‚
And yet He drank it all,
The Saviour drank it all,
The Saviour drank it all.

-Stuart Townend & Keith Getty


A Maundy Thursday Devotional: Wash Me

April 5, 2012

Music links updated 2014

Art Credit: Peter Paul Rubens “Christ washing the apostles’ feet. 1632

***

An excellent short reflection from the Barnstorming blog:

Psalm 51: 7

Cleanse me with hyssop, and I will be clean;  wash me.

It had to have been mortifying.  The Master, with a towel wrapped around His waist like a slave,  kneeling to wash His disciples’ dirty smelly feet covered with the dust of Jerusalem.  Though Peter protested, he was rebuked to submit, to comprehend the symbolism of the act.

It was this reversal that carried Him to the cross, the ultimate cleansing coming not just from His hands, but from His wounds, from His suffering, from His blood.

So He continues to wash off our everyday grime and gently, tenderly wipes us clean, knowing, realizing we will only get soiled again.

What wondrous love is this?

***

Songs for worship:


A Devotional for Wednesday in Holy Week: Betrayals

April 4, 2012

Music links updated 2014

Judas’ Kiss

art credit:  This fresco, by Giotto di Bondone, is from the Life of Christ series at the Arena Chapel (Cappella Scrovegni) in Padua, Italy.  Giotto created it between 1304-06.

***

This reflection follows on very well from the two main entries I posted yesterday:  a prayer acknowledging we too were enemies of Christ, and a reflection on Mary’s sacrificial offering (where at the end, I reflected on the contrast between Mary’s sacrifice and Judas’ meager reward for betraying Jesus.)  It is from the Barnstorming blog:

The reality is Jesus’ enemies weren’t really the Romans and Jews.  They were those who professed to love Him the most but then turned away when loving Jesus meant suffering with Him.  The betrayals that take place, resulting in His arrest and death,  are not by those who hated Jesus.   Jesus told His betrayers the truth about who they were, and what was in their hearts, by shining His light on their weakness, illuminating their sin even before they committed it.  He does the same with us every day.  We cannot hide from His light illuminating the dark corners of our heart.

We must face the fact that we continue to betray Him, usually in small ways that we hope are insignificant or hidden because, after all, we are Christians, we pray, we go to church, we are “good” people who certainly mean well.

We do no less than what Peter did three times.   We deny knowing Him when it is inconvenient to admit it.

We are no less selfish than Judas selling out for silver when what is being asked of us is to give up the material things of this world we hold dear.

We are no less cowardly than the throngs crying “Crucify Him!” when only days before they were  lauding him as the King of Kings and Lord of Lords, going along with the crowd,  as it feels risky to stand out, stand apart, be utterly alone in our devotion to Him rather than live out our love affair with the world along with everyone else.

So with friends like us…

We have some serious explaining to do.  Amazing that He knows our hearts even before we utter a word.

The full entry is here.

***

Two Songs for listening & reflection:

Traitor’s Look and WHY?  Both songs are by Michael Card, from his album Known by the Scars, which I highly highly recommend in full as an amazing musical reflection during Holy Week.

(Hopefully the playlist will work, but I’ve been having some issues with embedded audio files.  If the music does not play, you can find videos at YouTube:  Traitor’s Look,  and Why)


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