Reflecting on Christ as the Passover Lamb

April 5, 2012

*Music links updated 2014*

art credit: Francisco de Zurbarán. “Agnus Dei” found at StevenSizer.com

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Earlier this Lent, I came across two posts at the King’s English blog which I highly recommend as aids for reflecting on the Passover symbolism and the Exodus and their meaning for those who believe in Christ, our Passover, the Sacrifice Lamb:

Passover: I HIGHLY recommend reading it all!  But here’s an excerpt:

It’s not about the LORD inspecting each household to see whether it’s up to scratch.  It’s onlyabout whether the household is sheltering under the blood.  That is the only issue.

And it’s not even about how much faith you have in the blood.  If the blood is applied at all, you’re saved.  Strong faith in the blood and wavering faith in the blood lead to exactly the same outcome.  Because it’s not the faith in the blood that saves.  It’s the blood.

Do we see how Passover teaches us about our Christian lives?  Christ is our Lamb.  And His death on the cross was the true Passover – a plague of judgement that provides salvation for all who shelter under Him.

Therefore our salvation is entirely down to Him.  It’s not about the quality of our living, speaking, acting, praying.  It’s not even about the quality of  our own faith.  It’s only about the blood.  It’s the quality of His death, not the quality of our life.  Our salvation has nothing to do with our performance and everything to do with His performance.

Passover takes our eyes off our sins and off ourselves.  Our salvation is entirely outside ourselves.  It’s all about Jesus our Lamb.

Red Sea – An excerpt:

If you’re saved from judgement by Jesus’ sacrifice, won’t you just keep on wallowing in sin?  Doesn’t the cross mean that Christians will be complacent about sin and go on indulging in it?”

Actually the opposite is true.  Jesus doesn’t save us for sin, He saves us from sin.  And here’s how.  He doesn’t just die for us, He also rises to new life for us.

Or to put it in Exodus terms.  We don’t just enjoy a Passover, we also experience a Red Sea.  We’re not just sheltered under the blood of the Lamb, we’re also brought out of the land of slavery.

Those who benefited from the sacrificial lamb were also those who left Egypt.

And thus shall ye eat it; with your loins girded, your shoes on your feet, and your staff in your hand; and ye shall eat it in haste: it is the LORD’S passover.  (Exodus 12:11)

The lamb was not given so that God’s people could enjoy Egypt.  It was given to bring them out.  Any who said ‘Yes’ to the substitutionary sacrifice were also saying ‘No’ to the old life.

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Worship Music:

The Sacrifice Lamb, (by Lamb, from the 1995 album Lamb Favorites)

(There should be an embedded audio file and play arrow above, sometimes WordPress is being balky with embedded music.  If the song does not show up or does not play, there is a YouTube version here.)

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Bitter Herbs – A poem for Maundy Thursday

April 5, 2012

This poem by Anglican blogger Teresa Roberts Johnson, who blogs at Angliverse, was originally posted on Feb. 7 and I discovered it quite early in Lent, and have kept it bookmarked for a Maundy Thursday post, as we reflect on Christ, the Sacrifice Lamb.

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Thou, God’s Lamb, our Passover art,
And from Thy side deliverance flows;
Yea, Thy dread wounds did death impart
New life, for in Thee we arose.
Now from Thy side a river pours
To cleanse Thine own from every stain,
From every evil God abhors:
It was for this the Lamb was slain.
Now Thou dost give us bread and wine,
And perfect rest that naught disturbs,
For Thou has made us wholly Thine
And banned for aye the bitter herbs.

Copyright © 2012 by Teresa Roberts Johnson (All rights reserved)


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